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Freelancers in the Philippines Now Have a Low Cost Global Gig Platform in Both Filipino and English Languages

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The Global Gig-Economy in 2019 has ranked the Philippines sixth in the world for the number of its freelancers. The ranking found that the island nation freelancers and freelance gigs grew at a amazing 35% from the year before, bringing the total Philippines population working as freelancers to 2%. As the nation of freelancers is growing, so is the internal need for freelance services.

Communal Marketplace
CommunaMP.com provides low total cost and highly specialize gig services.

One of the most focused problems in the gig economy, and especially in non English cultures, is the ability to update freelancers about the many changes in their market, because not only is the freelance gig market moving very fast, but often the market a freelancer specializes in is moving even faster than the gig market overall. That’s why both companies and freelancers need to stay abreast of the latest news.

So, for example, Communal Freelance Gig Marketplace (CMP) combines with global newspaper Communal News to provide freelance technology news in the Filipio language with focused updates on local freelance industries such as Komunidad Freelance Gig Marketplace News.

CMP also believes that, in becoming a global gig provider, it is very important that you provide languages that help both the buyer and seller, no matter their country or language. Knowing the gig world has no borders, CMP is proud to provide language support to over 97% of the globe.

Villanueva, a senator in the Philippines, stressed the need for a law protecting freelance workers. He boasted that the Philippines was listed among the world’s fastest growing markets for freelancers and freelance gigs, and he announced that earnings from the sector rose by 35% this year.

CommunalMP.com services over 100 languages including Filipio for both buyers and sellers, and those languages cover over 97% of the Globe

Most people in the Philippines earn very low wages. By providing a global gig, a Filipino vendor can sell their services to the world. Opening an online service or business can be far more lucrative for Filipinos, especially if they are providing a truly specialized service that is in high demand. The pay is often far better than providing low-cost, often repetitive, labor.

The manager of PayPal Southeast Asia, Rahul Shingal, said:

“We are seeing more young people choosing to freelance as they become integral to the global economy, it is critical for them to be accorded the same respect that other professionals receive. We should do more to elevate the standing of freelancers as a community and empower them in their autonomy.”

To help achieve this increase respect for young gig professionals providing defined services in the freelance market, Communal MP is providing one of the lowest total costs for global gig transactions.  We are saving buyers and sellers about 40%, as our way of showing respect for freelancers, to help them increase their pay and keep a larger share of funds from their lucrative services. Communal has the ability, with their worldwide newspaper, to drive large robust traffic at far lower costs to gig providers in the Philippines.

Many believe the gig economy, especially in SE Asia will continue to evolve, providing a steady career that is built on flexibility.  Soon we will see companies from SE Asia buying and building on the global gig market.

It’s simple, easy and free to post a gig on the communal freelance global gig community.

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Economy

The Music Dies for Poland’s Gig Economy Workers

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There was a time when the ruling right-wing Law and Justice party (PiS) was seen as the champion of those relying on flexible forms of employment. Five years ago, when it came to power, it declared it would abolish “junk” contracts.

But critics say all PiS has done is to introduce a minimum hourly rate for casual workers to match minimum rates for employees on full contracts.

“It takes more time for the labour market to totally get out of these types of contracts,” said Wojciech Zubowski, PiS deputy chairman of the parliament’s economy and development committee. “Besides, for many people who don’t want to be associated with one company, this kind of employment is simply suitable.”

In recent years, Poland has seen economic growth and budget surpluses thanks in part to a buoyant global economic outlook and austerity reforms brought in by PiS’s predecessors. Poland’s unemployment rate hit a record low of 2.9 per cent in January. 

But critics say PiS has squandered the conditions it inherited. Instead of reforming the chaotic labour market, it has overseen a dramatic increase in social spending.

It introduced a “13th” and then a “14th” month of annual pension payments and one-off gifts of around 70 euros for school pupils. It also brought in an immensely popular subsidy of 110 euros a month for each child, regardless of a family’s income, which has cost taxpayers 18.5 billion euros since 2016.

Critics say PiS has also distributed money among loyalists in the public media, government agencies and bureaucracy — sectors that are key to the party’s grip on power — though PiS denies it.

“In times of prosperity, PiS has neither made serious investments nor savings,” said Katarzyna Lubnauer, a member of the Modern party, which along with Civic Platform, the main opposition party, forms the Civic Coalition alliance in parliament.

“So now there are relatively few funds that can be allocated to saving the economy.”

In times of prosperity, PiS has neither made serious investments nor savings. So now there are relatively few funds that can be allocated to saving the economy.

– Katarzyna Lubnauer, the Modern party

While Lubnauer faults PiS for not reorganising the labour market, she said for some workers it was a conscious choice to work on non-standard contracts, which offered them flexibility and exemption from paying social contributions.

But “what worked in times of prosperity becomes a burden in the crisis”, Lubnauer added.

Meanwhile, singer Marcin Januszkiewicz wonders if he will ever play a concert again as social distancing looks more and more like the new normal.

Whatever happens, though, he is trying to stay upbeat.

“The thought that we’re all together facing some unknown disaster rather builds me up,” he said.



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Economy

Help is on the way for Uber, Lyft drivers and other gig workers as economy sputters

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“That shift in the economy, we’re not going back, so I think hey, when we get through this people are going to be renting out rooms again and sharing their vehicles and participating in opportunities. So I don’t think there’s any necessarily turning back on the gig economy, I think it was such a shock to the system of many folks that were participating in it that saw this as their full time job. And there really isn’t a nice safety net, although some of the programs may be addressing and supporting them,” Goldberg said.

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Economy

Collaborations helping gig economy survive COVID-19

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Multiple partnerships between local governments and private businesses in the gig economy space are playing an important role in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic, a report by the Ola Mobility Institute (OMI), ‘Leveraging and Protecting the Gig Economy against COVID-19 has said. 

The report says such collaborations between governments and businesses has resulted in the government recognising the potential of gig workers in this crisis, by two non-fiscal strategies, i.e. by actively involving the technological capability of the platforms and their logistical networks (hands-on approach), and passively facilitating their operations through legal protection (hands-off approach). The agility of businesses implies fewer challenges to staffing their gig workforce, while also providing remunerative opportunities to gig workers, it said. 

In India, this collaboration has been seen as platforms such as Flipkart, Uber and Big Basket are partnering with each other in multiple cities to provide delivery of essentials.  

It calls for a collective effort to strengthen social partnership with platform companies to fast-track the recovery process from the COVID-19 crisis. Gig workers and platforms must be leveraged to better manage the crisis, fast-track recovery.

It also discusses steps to protect gig workers that have been taken by the new-age platforms and the governments. New businesses are strengthening safety measures, adapting to the new work environment, providing health access to all, expanding paid leave, and taking steps to secure the livelihoods of players in the gig economy. It also says that governments across the world have also announced multiple policy measures to minimise the human and economic impact of COVID-19, and particularly protect the gig workers.

Speaking on the report, Carson Dalton, Senior Director, Ola Mobility Institute said, “COVID-19 is an unprecedented crisis of our time. Under these extraordinary circumstances, gig workers and platform companies are adapting quickly and leveraging their workforce to ensure transportation services, delivery of essential commodities and medicines are available to the most vulnerable populations.” 

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