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Jenny McCarthy Quit New Year’s Eve Host Gig for 2019-2020

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Ryan Seacrest Jenny McCarthy New Year's Eve


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For the first time in almost a decade, Ryan Seacrest has a new New Year’s Eve Times Square correspondent for Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest because co-host Jenny McCarthy decided to call it quits for the 2019-2020 broadcast.

McCarthy revealed the news back in October on Live with Kelly and Ryan, citing her son, Evan, asking her to spend more time with him in between seasons of FOX reality singing competition The Masked Singer.

“We’re shooting Masked Singer 3, which is exciting, in December and January and my son, who is 17, says, ‘Can we please, please stay home this year?’ and I was like, ‘You know what? He’s going to be 18 [soon], he’s going to want nothing to do with me,’” said McCarthy. “We’re so busy that I said, you know what, I’m going to tap out. I talked to Ryan last week and I said I’m not going to be doing New Year’s Eve this year.”

Jenny McCarthy Is Taking a Break from Hosting on New Year’s EveJenny McCarthy talks about why she won’t be hosting on New Year’s Eve with Ryan this year. Subscribe: https://bit.ly/2HFUeAK Website: https://kellyandryan.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiveKellyandRyan/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/livekellyandryan/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/LiveKellyRyan2019-10-07T18:14:05.000Z

McCarthy added, “But I gotta say, it was the most wonderful time. As you know, working with Ryan — it’s a dream. We can’t say that about a lot of people in this business. He’s a dream.”

“Ninety-nine percent of them it’s a nightmare,” said Kelly Ripa. “Ryan is a dream.”

“So I thank you, and I’m going to be so excited to watch,” finished McCarthy.

Seacrest also had nothing but praise for his co-host, saying McCarthy has been “the most amazing partner on New Year’s Eve with us in Times Square.”

Taking over for McCarthy is actress Lucy Hale, who has been the Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve New Orleans correspondent since 2016. She’ll be the new Times Square host and Pose star Billy Porter will take over for Hale in New Orleans. For the second year in a row, Ciara will host the Hollywood segments.


New Year’s Eve marks the end of a calendar year on the Gregorian calendar, the calendar first introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, after whom it is named. Most countries celebrate the final day the year with parties, social gatherings, festivals, and/or fireworks. It goes by many names the world over, including Hogmanay in Scotland, Calennig in Wales, Baharu in Indonesia and Malaysia, Silvester in many European countries, Reveillon in France, Portugal, and Brazil, Kanun Novodgo Goda in Russia, and Omisoka in Japan.

Kiritimati, Tonga, and New Zealand are some of the first places to celebrate New Year’s Eve because they are located just west of the International Date Line, while the U.S.’ Baker Island is one of the last places to celebrate because it is just east of the International Date Line. Interestingly, because of the way the International Date Line jogs around a bit, Kiritimati is actually east of Baker Island.

In the United States, New Year’s is traditionally celebrated with parties and “drops,” the most famous of which is the ball drop held in New York City’s Times Square. But there are dozens of other “drops” held across the country, including a conch drop in Key West, Florida; a peach drop in Atlanta; an Indy car drop in Indianapolis; an acorn drop in Raleigh, North Carolina; a moon pie drop in Mobile, Alabama; a fleur-de-lis drop in New Orleans, a “Glowtato” drop in Boise, Idaho; and a tortilla chip drop in Tempe, Arizona, which is tied in to the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl game of college football.

New York also rings in the new year with a “Midnight Run” around Central Park that includes a fireworks show. Other fireworks displays around the country include shows at the Disney theme parks, the Las Vegas strip, and the Chicago “Chi-Town Rising” event.

READ NEXT: New Year’s Eve 2019-20 TV Schedule: Show Times & Channels to Watch




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Why California Prop 22 Is A Vote On The Gig Economy

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Proposition 22 is, essentially, a special law just for app-based companies like Uber, Lyft, Postmates, Instacart, and DoorDash. Under Prop 22, they would not be subject to the existing laws around employee classification. This exemption would essentially create a lesser class of employees who are deprived of the full workers’ protections and benefits that other employers have to provide.

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Gig economy: California Appellate Court affirms Uber and Lyft must reclassify California drivers as employees

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By Jack Schaedel and Jamin Xu, Firm:  FordHarrison

Uber and Lyft will be required to reclassify drivers and riders previously considered independent contractors as employees following a ruling from a California appeal court affirming the preliminary injunction that imposed this obligation on 10 August 2020.

On 22 October 2020, a California appellate court affirmed a preliminary injunction requiring Uber and Lyft to reclassify California drivers from independent contractors to employees and to comply with the California Labor Code, the Unemployment Insurance Code, and the Industrial Welfare Commission wage orders, as requested by California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra and the City Attorneys of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego. A further discussion of that original 10 August 2020 San Francisco Superior Court’s original 33-page decision can be found here.

Summary of the Order

The appellate court unanimously sided with the Superior Court in holding that the State and city governments are ultimately likely to succeed on the merits in arguing that Uber’s and Lyft’s drivers are employees, not independent contractors, under the rigorous ABC test set forth under California Assembly Bill 5 (‘AB 5’).

AB 5, which took effect at the beginning of 2020, codified the test to determine whether a worker can be classified as an independent contractor set forth under the California Supreme Court case Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles (2018) 4 Cal.5th 903, which presumes workers are employees unless an employer can establish three factors:

(A) that the worker is free from the control and direction of the hiring entity in connection with the performance of the work, both under the contract for the performance of the work and in fact;

(B) that the worker performs work that is outside the usual course of the hiring entity’s business; and

(C) that the worker is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, or business of the same nature as the work performed.

Click here https://theword.iuslaboris.com/hrlaw/insights/us-worker-or-independent-contractor-californias-new-test for a full discussion of Dynamex.

Because Dynamex was issued over two years ago, the Court reasoned that companies like Uber and Lyft, who utilise independent contractors as a significant portion of their workforce, have had significant time to contemplate how they can proceed with reclassifying workers as employees. Therefore, the Court reasoned that requiring Uber and Lyft to comply with the preliminary injunction would not result in irreparable harm. On the contrary, the court specifically affirmed the trial court’s reasoning that:

‘rectifying the various forms of irreparable harm shown by the People more strongly serves the public interest than protecting Uber, Lyft, their shareholders, and all of those who have come to rely on the advantages on online ride-sharing delivered by a business model that does not provide employment benefits to drivers.’

Therefore, the Court required Uber and Lyft to comply with the San Francisco Superior Court’s preliminary injunction order beginning 30 days after the Court issues its forthcoming remittitur of the appeal.

Likely impact and Proposition 22

Although the legislature has recently enacted exemptions for certain types of workers, including certain writers, musicians and artists, as well as individuals providing certain ‘professional services,’ from the AB 5 test (see here), this most recent decision signifies that under the current ABC test, Uber’s and Lyft’s drivers are unlikely to be able to remain as independent contractors, in the absence of subsequent intervention from the legislature or the passage of Proposition 22 on California’s ballot initiative this November (see here for details of Proposition 22).

However, employers should keep in mind that even the passage of Proposition 22 is unlikely to provide their specific businesses with exemptions from AB 5, as it is intended to apply specifically to ride-hailing companies so that their drivers can be classified as independent contractors in exchange for increased worker protections such as guarantees in minimum earnings, expense reimbursements, healthcare subsidies and insurance coverage for on the-job injuries.

Furthermore, this decision signifies that a government enforcement action brought by the state and local governments of California will be able to seek compliance with AB 5 through the use of preliminary injunctions even at the early stages of a lawsuit, while the case is ongoing.

If a preliminary injunction is granted, employers could find themselves having to provide workers, on very short notice, all benefits commonly associated with non-exempt employees in California, including minimum and overtime wages, meal and rest period premiums, reimbursements for business expenses, sick leave, workers’ compensation coverage, unemployment insurance, paid family and sick leave, and wage replacement programs like disability insurance. Employers could also find themselves having to pay taxes and penalties on very short notice.

Additionally, even if Proposition 22 or any other legislative exemptions pass in the near future, their effects are unlikely to be retroactive. Therefore, entities who use independent contractors may continue to be exposed to legal liability through government enforcement mechanisms and/or class and representative Private Attorneys General Act (‘PAGA’) actions.

Businesses utilising independent contractors are advised to continue to track legal developments and consult with experienced labour and employment counsel to evaluate the continuing viability of this classification for their specific business.

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Cardinal Nation happy for Tony La Russa’s new gig

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ST. LOUIS – Former Cardinals skipper Tony La Russa is returning to manage the Chicago White Sox. La Russa and World Series wins are no strangers here in St. Louis.

Cardinals broadcaster Mike Claiborne, a La Russa friend, believes the Hall-of-Famer will do well in Chicago.

“He’s got a good team to work with; some good young talent. They need a little leadership,” he said.

The White Sox and Cardinals are expected to meet in interleague play next season.

“Everybody wanted to see Tony do well,” Claiborne said. “And I want to see him do well, except when he plays the Cardinals.”

Claiborne said he texted Tony and congratulated him. Tony replied: “It should be fun.”

At Ballpark Village, there was well-wishes from fans.

“He’s a good guy,” said Armando Sierra. “He’s done good for baseball and for him to get another chance, why not?”

La Russa, 76, managed the Cardinals from 1996 to 2011.

“You’re never too old; you’re never too old,” Sierra said. “That’s just a number.”

Down the street at the Midwestern, more well wishes from Cardinal supporters who believe La Russa will get a warm welcome when the White Sox play at Busch Stadium.

“Probably get the reaction that (David) Freese got when he came back; everybody cheered for him,” said Cardinals fan John Pizzitola.

Claiborne added: “Warm would be an understatement. It will be seismic for sure.”

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