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Loy Mendonsa on Shankar-Ehsaan-Loys Chennai gig for The Shakti Foundation

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Not many music directors of Bollywood can boast of a better discography than that of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s (SEL). Having been present at the forefront of the Hindi movie industry’s contemporary music revolution during the first decade of the millennium (a period that is undoubtedly the group’s golden period as well) SEL has consistently given us memorable soundtracks for over two decades now, while exploring a range of genres and styles, starting with most notably Dil Chahta Hai.

Over the years, they have forayed into other regional languages as well, like Tamil, Telugu and Malayalam, and have also been actively involved on stage with live concerts. This week, the trio will perform in Chennai, as a part of The Shakti Foundation’s annual fundraising concert Gurucarana, to enable medical aid for underprivileged people in rural areas.  

Ahead of the performance, we caught up with Loy Mendonsa for a quick chat, which started with him talking about their association with the Foundation, a partnership that goes a long way, we learnt. “It was around ten years ago that we first performed for them after they approached Shankar to put a band together. He gathered a group of musicians including Sivamani, U Srinivas and me, and named the band Shraddha, which performed a unique brand of spiritual fusion music at special occasions with socially-inclined causes,” says Loy. As for SEL themselves, their first performance for the Foundation was around six to seven years ago, he further adds. 

Sharing his thoughts on the kind of work done by the Foundation, he says, “It’s fantastic. As much as one side of the country has progressed, there are still some with a mindset that thinks that somebody who is handicapped should not work and should be at home. So the fact that they provide facilities for them, especially in the fields of education and medicine for all age groups, is a very beautiful thing. It’s good to be able to support that.” 

Every second counts 
Do they plan their live performances based on the themes of such events, we ask. He says, “There will definitely be moments where we will get into that zone. But the truth is that a lot of people know that our music is very diverse. So they will be expecting us to play tunes that are popular among them, including some of our regular classics. We actually have a whole list of songs, but we have to first gauge the audience and its age group before finalising what tracks we will finally play.” 

Speaking of songs, SEL has produced some of the most memorable music for Bollywood in the past, that too with incredible consistency. Talking about how they have stuck together for so many years, Loy shares that it goes beyond movies and music. “We have developed a very beautiful working relationship. I guess our personalities and characters come into play. But it’s not easy…what with different points of views, but we always try to look at it objectively, keeping in mind the movie or the song.” 

Which is perhaps why, in general, the number of songs has reduced in every movie, he observes, while crediting the rise of technology to the changes in the way people consume music. “Unlike the days of cassettes and CDs, the present-day digital era sees an incredible amount of musical data at our disposal. There’s so much to take into consideration when making music now. With dependence on streaming services higher than ever before, long songs may not appeal to audiences of today, who may be tempted to fast forward it!” he says, adding, “Also, with buffering and network speed being crucial factors, especially in rural areas, long songs might be a hindrance to a smooth viewing experience as well.”

 

Hear, hear!
But regardless of length or the movie that the song belongs to, we know it is hard for talented songwriters to be noticed in the present scheme of things. Loy agrees while sharing his opinion about the kind of music that Bollywood is churning out at present. “This problem stems from the fact that only one or two record companies are promoting content, and they may not give priority to the good ones. It’s like a store that doesn’t put out its entire range of products and forces its customers to consume only what it’s selling, till the time there is an alternative. But I believe a shift will happen soon,” he assures, saying, “Think about it — just like there’s a section of people wanting to listen to film music, there’s an equally massive section of music lovers who do not want to listen to film music. Instead, they are into folk, classical and alternative. But the impending change needs time to come about.” 

This way, that way
However, there is another section of the audience that plays a crucial role as well, he points out — those who take the trouble of recommending lesser-known songs of unsuccessful movies, regardless of who composed it. Talking of examples like Yuvvraaj, which was a massive box-office disappointment but featured one of AR Rahman’s best ever soundtracks, Loy says, “Box-office hits strike a chord with only a certain section of people, but it doesn’t always need to mean that they are great.”

That said, the way music is represented is naturally evolving. Loy is quick to come with a stirring comparison of the yesteryear and modern way of video production. “Let’s say that there’s a song that is supposed to be shot in a desert. Earlier, a helicopter would be the way to shoot lengthy shots here. But today, we can shoot the same with a drone as well, giving it a completely different perspective. Also, with the advent of virtual reality and the 360° experience, things are shaping up,” The same logic applies to remakes as well, he says. “Also, the new generation may not like to listen to a song in the way it was originally composed. This is where remakes come into play. So, I think that’s okay since consumption patterns keep changing, as long as they listen to music.” 

 

 

Future is bright
Looking ahead, Loy shared details about their upcoming projects this year and delighted us with names of some familiar collaborators and throwback projects — namely Farhan Akhtar in Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra’s sports film Toofan, and Bunty Aur Babli, the sequel to which is in the works. But before all these, there is Yash Raj Film’s epic Prithviraj, directed by Chandraprakash Dwivedi and starring Akshay Kumar and Manushi Chillar. “The year started well with Meghna Gulzar’s Chhapaak, and it looks like it’s going to continue in the same vein,” concludes Loy.

February 15, 7 pm. At The Music Academy. Donor passes available at The Shakti Foundation. 

 



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Gig Workers Face Shifting Roles, Competition in Pandemic  | Voice of America

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NEW YORK – There were the two-hour, unpaid waits outside supermarkets when San Francisco first started to lock down, on top of the heavy shopping bags that had to be lugged up countless flights of stairs.  

And yet even after signing up for several apps, 39-year-old Saori Okawa still wasn’t making as much money delivering meals and groceries as she did driving for ride-hailing giant Uber before the pandemic struck. 

“I started to juggle three apps to make ends meet,” said Okawa, who recently reduced her work hours after receiving unemployment benefits. “It was really hard, because at that time, I could not afford to stay home because I had to pay rent.” 

Okawa is one of an estimated 1.5 million so-called gig workers who make a living driving people to airports, picking out produce at grocery stores or providing child care for working parents. Theirs had already been a precarious situation, largely without safeguards such as minimum wage, unemployment insurance, workers compensation and health and safety protections. 

But with the pandemic pummeling the global economy and U.S. unemployment reaching heights not seen since the Great Depression, gig workers are clamoring for jobs that often pay less while facing stiff competition from a crush of newly unemployed workers also attempting to patch together a livelihood – all while trying to avoid contracting the coronavirus themselves. 

U.S. unemployment fell to 11.1% in June, a Depression-era level that, while lower than last month, could worsen after a surge in coronavirus cases has led states to close restaurants and bars. 

Marisa Martin, a law school student in California, turned to Instacart when a state government summer job as paralegal fell through after a hiring freeze. She said she enjoys the flexibility of choosing her own hours but hopes not to have to turn to gig work in the future. The pay is too volatile — with tips varying wildly and work sometimes slow — to be worth the risk of exposure to the virus.  

“We are not getting paid nearly enough when we’re on the front lines interacting with multiple people daily,” said Martin, 24, who moved in with her parents temporarily to save money.  

Alexandra Lopez-Djurovic checks her shopping list as she shops for a client in an Acme supermarket, in Bronxville, N.Y., July 1, 2020.

Alexandra Lopez-Djurovic, 26, was a full-time nanny in a New York City suburb when one of the parents she works for lost her job while the other saw his hours cut. 

“All of a sudden, as much as they want me to stay, they can’t afford to pay me,” she said. Her own hours were reduced to about eight per week. 

To make up lost wages, Lopez-Djurovic placed an ad offering grocery delivery on a local Facebook group. Overnight, she got 50 responses.  

Lopez-Djurovic charges $30 an hour and coordinates shopping lists over email, offering perks the app companies don’t such as checking the milk’s expiration date before choosing which size to buy. Still, it doesn’t replace the salary she lost. 

“One week I might have seven, eight, 10 families I was shopping for,” Lopez-Djurovic said. “I had a week when I had no money. That’s definitely a challenge.” 

Upwork, a website that connects skilled freelance workers with jobs, has seen a 50% increase in signups by both workers and employers since the pandemic began, including spikes in jobs related to ecommerce and customer service, said Adam Ozimek, chief economist at Upwork. 

“When you need to make big changes fast, a flexible workforce helps you,” he said. 

Maya Pinto, a researcher at the National Employment Law Project, said temporary and contract work grew during Great Recession and she expects that many workers will seek such jobs again amid the current crisis.  

But increased reliance on temporary and contract work will have negative implications on job quality and security because it “is a way of saving costs and shifting risk onto the worker,” Pinto said. 

It’s difficult to assess the overall picture of the gig economy during the pandemic since some parts are expanding while others are contracting. Grocery delivery giant Instacart, for instance, has brought on 300,000 new contracted shoppers since March, more than doubling its workforce to 500,000. Meanwhile, Uber’s business fell 80% in April compared with last year while Lyft’s tumbled 75% in the same period. 

For food delivery apps, it’s been a mixed bag. Although they are getting a bump from restaurants offering more takeout options, those gains are being offset by the restaurant industry’s overall decline during the pandemic.  

Gig workers are also jockeying for those jobs from all fronts. DoorDash launched an initiative to help out-of-work restaurant workers sign up for delivery work. Uber’s food delivery service, Uber Eats, grew 53% in the first quarter and around 200,000 people have signed up for the app per month since March — about 50% more than usual.  

“Drivers are definitely exploring other options, but the issue is that there’s 20 or 30 million people looking for work right now,” said Harry Campbell, founder of The Rideshare Guy. “Sometimes I joke all you need is a pulse and a car to get approved. But what that means is it’s easy for other people to get approved too, so you have to compete for shifts.” 

Delivery jobs typically pay less than ride-hailing jobs. Single mom Luz Laguna used to earn about $25 in a half-hour driving passengers to Los Angeles International Airport. 

When those trips evaporated, Laguna began delivering meals through Uber Eats, working longer hours but making less cash. The base pay is around $6 per delivery, and most people tip around $2, she said. To avoid shelling out more for childcare, she sometimes brings her 3-year-old son along on deliveries. 

“This is our only way out right now,” Laguna said. “It’s hard managing, but that’s the only job that I can be able to perform as a single mother.” 

Other drivers find it makes more sense to stay home and collect unemployment — a benefit they and other gig workers hadn’t qualified for before the pandemic. They are also eligible to receive an additional $600 weekly check from the federal government, a benefit that became available to workers who lost their jobs during the pandemic. Taken together, that’s more than what many ride-hailing drivers were making before the pandemic, Campbell said. 

But that $600 benefit will expire at the end of July, and the $2 trillion government relief package that extended unemployment benefits to gig workers expires at the end of the year. 

 

“So many drivers are going to have to sit down and decide, do I want to put myself at risk and my family at risk once I’m not getting the government assistance?” Campbell said. 

 

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Gig workers face shifting roles

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NEW YORK — There were the two-hour, unpaid waits outside supermarkets when San Francisco first started to lock down, on top of the heavy shopping bags that had to be lugged up countless flights of stairs.

And yet even after signing up for several apps, 39-year-old Saori Okawa still wasn’t making as much money delivering meals and groceries as she did driving for ride-hailing giant Uber before the pandemic struck.

“I started to juggle three apps to make ends meet,” said Okawa, who recently reduced her work hours after receiving unemployment benefits. “It was really hard, because at that time, I could not afford to stay home because I had to pay rent.”

Okawa is one of an estimated 1.5 million so-called gig workers who make a living driving people to airports, picking out produce at grocery stores or providing childcare for working parents. Theirs had already been a precarious situation, largely without safeguards such as minimum wage, unemployment insurance, workers compensation and health and safety protections.

But with the pandemic pummeling the global economy and U.S. unemployment reaching heights not seen since the Great Depression, gig workers are clamoring for jobs that often pay less while facing stiff competition from a crush of newly unemployed workers also attempting to patch together a livelihood – all while trying to avoid contracting the coronavirus themselves.

U.S. unemployment fell to 11.1% in June, a Depression-era level that, while lower than last month, could worsen after a surge in coronavirus cases has led states to close restaurants and bars.

Marisa Martin, a law school student in California, turned to Instacart when a state government summer job as paralegal fell through after a hiring freeze. She said she enjoys the flexibility of choosing her own hours but hopes not to have to turn to gig work in the future. The pay is too volatile — with tips varying wildly and work sometimes slow — to be worth the risk of exposure to the virus.

“We are not getting paid nearly enough when we’re on the front lines interacting with multiple people daily,” said Martin, 24, who moved in with her parents temporarily to save money.

Alexandra Lopez-Djurovic, 26, was a full-time nanny in a New York City suburb when one of the parents she works for lost her job while the other saw his hours cut.

“All of a sudden, as much as they want me to stay, they can’t afford to pay me,” she said. Her own hours were reduced to about eight per week.

To make up lost wages, Lopez-Djurovic placed an ad offering grocery delivery on a local Facebook group. Overnight, she got 50 responses.

Lopez-Djurovic charges $30 an hour and coordinates shopping lists over email, offering perks the app companies don’t such as checking the milk’s expiration date before choosing which size to buy. Still, it doesn’t replace the salary she lost.

“One week I might have seven, eight, 10 families I was shopping for,” Lopez-Djurovic said. “I had a week when I had no money. That’s definitely a challenge.”

Upwork, a website that connects skilled freelance workers with jobs, has seen a 50% increase in signups by both workers and employers since the pandemic began, including spikes in jobs related to ecommerce and customer service, said Adam Ozimek, chief economist at Upwork.

“When you need to make big changes fast, a flexible workforce helps you,” he said.

Maya Pinto, a researcher at the National Employment Law Project, said temporary and contract work grew during Great Recession and she expects that many workers will seek such jobs again amid the current crisis.

But increased reliance on temporary and contract work will have negative implications on job quality and security because it “is a way of saving costs and shifting risk onto the worker,” Pinto said.

It’s difficult to assess the overall picture of the gig economy during the pandemic since some parts are expanding while others are contracting. Grocery delivery giant Instacart, for instance, has brought on 300,000 new contracted shoppers since March, more than doubling its workforce to 500,000. Meanwhile, Uber’s business fell 80% in April compared with last year while Lyft’s tumbled 75% in the same period.

For food delivery apps, it’s been a mixed bag. Although they are getting a bump from restaurants offering more takeout options, those gains are being offset by the restaurant industry’s overall decline during the pandemic.

Gig workers are also jockeying for those jobs from all fronts. DoorDash launched an initiative to help out-of-work restaurant workers sign up for delivery work. Uber’s food delivery service, Uber Eats, grew 53% in the first quarter and around 200,000 people have signed up for the app per month since March — about 50% more than usual.

“Drivers are definitely exploring other options, but the issue is that there’s 20 or 30 million people looking for work right now,” said Harry Campbell, founder of The Rideshare Guy. “Sometimes I joke all you need is a pulse and a car to get approved. But what that means is it’s easy for other people to get approved too, so you have to compete for shifts.”

Delivery jobs typically pay less than ride-hailing jobs. Single mom Luz Laguna used to earn about $25 in a half-hour driving passengers to Los Angeles International Airport. When those trips evaporated, Laguna began delivering meals through Uber Eats, working longer hours but making less cash. The base pay is around $6 per delivery, and most people tip around $2, she said. To avoid shelling out more for childcare, she sometimes brings her 3-year-old son along on deliveries.

“This is our only way out right now,” Laguna said. “It’s hard managing, but that’s the only job that I can be able to perform as a single mother.”

Other drivers find it makes more sense to stay home and collect unemployment — a benefit they and other gig workers hadn’t qualified for before the pandemic. They are also eligible to receive an additional $600 weekly check from the federal government, a benefit that became available to workers who lost their jobs during the pandemic. Taken together, that’s more than what many ride-hailing drivers were making before the pandemic, Campbell said.

But that $600 benefit will expire at the end of July, and the $2 trillion government relief package that extended unemployment benefits to gig workers expires at the end of the year.

“So many drivers are going to have to sit down and decide, do I want to put myself at risk and my family at risk once I’m not getting the government assistance?” Campbell said.



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Gig Based Business Market 2020 – Production, Supply, Demand, Analysis & Forecast to 2025

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Gig Based Business  Market 2020 – Production, Supply, Demand, Analysis & Forecast to 2025

Growth forecast on “ Gig Based Business Market Size | Industry Segment by Applications (Freelancer, Independent Contractor, Project Worker, Part-Time, Other, Gig Based Business is mainly used in following Application groups: Freelancer, Independent Contractor, Project Worker and Part-Time and Others. And Freelancers are the most widely used group which takes up about 36.54% of the global market in 2019), by Type (APP-based, Website-based and Website-based is the most widely used types which takes up about 52% of the total sales in 2019), Regional Outlook, Market Demand, Latest Trends, Gig Based Business Industry Share & Revenue by Manufacturers, Company Profiles, Growth Forecasts – 2025.

The Gig Based Business market research report delivers a qualitative and quantitative assessment of this industry vertical and contains crucial insights pertaining to revenue predictions, industry remuneration, market size, and valuation over the analysis timeframe.

The document measures the key factors which are positively influencing the industry landscape in terms of market growth as well as sales generation. Furthermore, it offers comprehensive analysis of the major market trends and their impact on the overall business outlook.

Request Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.aeresearch.net/request-sample/236302

Key aspects of Gig Based Business market report:

  • Growth rate
  • Current market trends
  • Competitive ranking analysis
  • Industry drivers
  • Effect of COVID-19 outbreak
  • Market concentration ratio
  • Regional bifurcation
  • Consumption growth rate

Regional analysis of Gig Based Business market:

Gig Based Business Market Segmentation: Americas, APAC, Europe, Middle East & Africa.

An overview of the regional landscape of Gig Based Business market:

  • Market share generated by all the geographies listed.
  • Consumption graphs of each region.
  • Expected revenues every terrain will accumulate over the forecast period.
  • Growth rate predictions.

Product landscape and application scope of Gig Based Business market:

Product landscape:

Product types: APP-based, Website-based and Website-based is the most widely used types which takes up about 52% of the total sales in 2019

Key factors mentioned in the report:

  • Consumption graphs of all the product varieties
  • Product sales
  • Estimated revenues accrued by each product
  • Market share garnered by every product fragment

Application Landscape:

Application segmentation: Freelancer, Independent Contractor, Project Worker, Part-Time, Other, Gig Based Business is mainly used in following Application groups: Freelancer, Independent Contractor, Project Worker and Part-Time and Others. And Freelancers are the most widely used group which takes up about 36.54% of the global market in 2019

Insights provided by the document:

  • Consumption patterns of all applications listed.
  • Industry share of each application fragment.
  • Revenue projections of every application fragment during the forecast period.

Additional details specified in the document:

  • The study inspects the hindering factors that may adversely influence the overall market outlook.
  • A granular assessment of the factors that are projected to impact the commercialization graph of the Gig Based Business market over the study period.

Competitive arena of the Gig Based Business market:

Major players in the Gig Based Business market: TaskRabbit, Favor Delivery, BellHops, HopSkipDrive, Freelancer, Guru.com, Fiverr, Rover, DoorDash, Upwork and Turo

Key aspects listed in the report:

  • Data regarding the product sales
  • Market share as well as value predictions of major companies
  • Pricing models of the manufactured goods/services
  • Sales area & distribution scope

The report’s major objectives include:

  • To establish a comprehensive, factual, annually updated and cost-effective information based on performance, capabilities, goals and strategies of the world’s leading companies.
  • To help current suppliers realistically assess their financial, marketing and technological capabilities vis-a-vis leading competitors.
  • To assist potential market entrants in evaluating prospective acquisitions and joint venture candidates.
  • To complement organizations’ internal competitor information gathering efforts by providing strategic analysis, data interpretation and insight.
  • To identify the least competitive market niches with significant growth potential.

Request Customization on This Report @ https://www.aeresearch.net/request-for-customization/236302

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