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Working in the Gig Economy with Younique

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– 04-02-2020 (PRDistribution.com) — A glance at recent statistics can draw the conclusion that not only are the times changing for many workers around the world, but they have already changed! For many individuals, the day of working in a traditional 9-5 office atmosphere is a relic of the past. The trend now skews more toward making an income on your own terms. More and more people are becoming their own bosses while creating a lifestyle that is geared toward creating a life of flexibility and happiness as a number one priority. According to recent statistics, about 36% of working Americans are now involved in the gig economy. 

There are many companies creating waves in the gig economy. Companies like Uber, Lyft, Upwork, and Airbnb are creating a massive shift from traditional work and full-time employment to freelancing, working part-time, and independent contracting. In the gig economy, workers have temporary or part-time positions. This position allows gig economy workers to frequently change employers or work for several different businesses at the same time. Data shows that American freelancers contributed more than $1.28 trillion to the American economy in recent years. Younique, a direct-sales company based in Lehi, Utah, focuses on empowering hard-working gig-workers, with premium quality cosmetics. Derek Maxfield and Melanie Huscroft, a brother-and-sister team, founded Younique in September 2012 with a mission to uplift, empower, and validate women across the globe. Derek and Melanie say that they firmly believe that all women should feel valued, smart, and empowered through opportunities to better themselves. Companies like Younique offer women (& men) the opportunity to join a network of like-minded individuals who work together to build one another up. There is no competition within good communities like this, but instead, camaraderie, passion for excellence, and a love of what they do. Statistics say that 78% of remote workers primarily work from home. Freelancer statistics note that the majority of freelancers and remote workers consider flexible working hours to be the most significant advantage of working remotely. Younique was the first direct sales company to market and sell almost exclusively through the use of social media. Some other direct sales companies like Scentsy followed suit, but Younique says that they were the first. The company maintains that its pioneered Younique Virtual Parties continue to this day to bridge the tremendous world of social media and the traditional home party business model. Younique Virtual Parties are how Younique Presenters are sharing their products during this trying time. You do not have to leave your home to invite anyone you want to participate. Younique claims that they provide the innovative and interactive tools and invite you to tap into your own resources and connections that you already have. All you have to do is share a link. In Aug. 2019, Younique launched the company’s first try-on tool that bridges the gap between an online and on-site shopping experience. This one-of-a-kind tool utilizes state-of-the-art facial analysis to allow the user to try on cosmetic products before they purchase virtually. This technology transformed the way Younique Presenters and consumers interact with the brand’s premium cosmetics, allowing the consumer to try before they buy and answer the age-old question, “Will this look good on me?” It serves as a great tool for each Younique Presenter in recommending the right products and product shades for their loyal customer base while increasing overall consumer satisfaction. “Since the beginning, Younique has always been a brand at the forefront of technology,” Younique Co-founder and Chief Visionary Officer, Melanie Huscroft said. Younique explains how their model allows you to get paid instantly through their compensation program, which is an excellent plus in these uncertain times. With the onset of the COVID-19 virus, many individuals have lost employment or have had their jobs put on hold indefinitely. Through companies like Younique, there is the opportunity to immediately begin earning an income through the safety of your own home in the hours you want to work, and get paid within hours of sales you close as a gig-worker. With the right mindset and some hard work, almost anyone has what it takes to get started in a network marketing business like Younique. In businesses like Younique, there is the opportunity to create your own stability that currently does not exist in most traditional jobs in the economy.The gig economy trends from a recent study, which mentioned that 51% of freelancers say there is not a high enough offer for them to take a traditional job, which shows that it’s not all about the money. Many Presenters for Younique, known as the Y-Sisterhood, say that the experiences they have had with the company are invaluable. “The moment you start being your true self and doing what makes you happy, that’s when your business will start to be super fun and not like a job,” said Kelsey Nemier-Cook, a Younique Presenter.

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Labor Groups, San Francisco Push Bogus Taxpayer-Funded Survey to Support Anti-Gig Law

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A liberal advocacy group’s own researchers raised red flags about a taxpayer-funded study used to justify a union campaign against the California gig economy.

The San Francisco Local Agency Formation Commission helped fund a survey conducted by Jobs with Justice, a left-wing advocacy group largely funded by labor powerhouse Service Employees International Union (SEIU). The survey reported that 71 percent of gig workers in the San Francisco area work more than 30 hours a week and receive “poverty level” wages. According to the group’s website, Jobs with Justice planned to use the survey to “make policy recommendations and support organizing” among gig workers. The survey’s summary page emphasizes the need to enforce anti-gig labor laws.

Left-wing labor group Gig Workers Rising has used the survey to rally in support of California Assembly Bill 5, a controversial law limiting companies’ ability to classify workers as independent contractors. The group called the study “the most comprehensive survey of actual work done” in the gig economy. Internal communications obtained by the Washington Free Beacon, however, reveal that the survey was pitched to potential financial backers as “not representative,” and an academic researcher involved in the study voiced concerns regarding Jobs with Justice’s recruitment tactics.

While the study initially called for 1,200 survey respondents, Jobs with Justice narrowed the scope following the spread of coronavirus, pivoting to an online survey focusing on the pandemic that aimed to reach just 500 respondents.

“The goal behind an online survey of 500 workers, while not representative, would be to turn around data quickly … in order to inform current policy discussions,” an internal description of the updated survey obtained by the Free Beacon said. It went on to reach just 219 respondents.

Pacific Research Institute senior fellow Wayne Winegarden criticized the study’s methodology, calling the survey’s results “meaningless.”

“The survey is not representative of the intended population with the original goal of 500 responses,” Winegarden told the Free Beacon. “The study did not reach this amount, having only 219 responses. So, in no uncertain terms do these results represent the view of gig workers.”

The study also downplayed Jobs with Justice’s involvement in an attempt to bolster its academic appeal. While the published survey lists UC Santa Cruz professor Chris Benner as the project’s lead, Jobs with Justice executive director Kung Feng is described as “leading” the project in internal emails obtained by the Free Beacon. The emails also show that the online survey was written by the group’s research director, Erin Johansson. Benner merely “edited the wording in a few questions,” according to the internal communications.

Benner, who did not return request for comment, also raised concerns regarding Jobs with Justice’s incentive plan to provide a gift card to all survey respondents.

“One, I’m not sure where the budget for that comes from, and two, with an online survey, it leaves open lots of opportunities for people to game it,” Benner wrote in a March 17 email to Johansson.

Following the academic’s objection, Gig Workers Rising continued to advertise the survey in an April tweet by saying respondents would “get a $10 gift card.” A Jobs with Justice invoice for the study listed $45,181 in “survey costs,” including “incentives and app payments.” While the published study lists the gig economy companies each of the survey’s 219 respondents work for, internal data obtained by the Free Beacon shows that 91 of the respondents did not report their company, suggesting some may have been non-gig workers who completed the survey for the incentive.

The invoice was sent to San Francisco Local Agency Formation Commission executive officer Bryan Goebel, who solicited funding for the study on Jobs with Justice’s behalf, internal emails show. Reached for comment, Goebel said the coronavirus-related study “was never intended to be” representative and that $50,000 in taxpayer funds were used only for the “initial pilot survey” launched prior to coronavirus. The final study combined the results of both the pilot survey and coronavirus-related survey, a methodological red flag, according to Winegarden.

“In the midst of the survey being in the field, they stopped the survey, reworked it to account for the coronavirus, and then continued with the survey,” Winegarden told the Free Beacon. “These results from before and after cannot be compared to one another.”

Goebel also told the Free Beacon that Benner “was indeed the overall lead” on the study, adding that Jobs with Justice simply “led the outreach.” He did not address the fact that the coronavirus-related survey was drafted by Jobs with Justice.

Charlyce Bozzello, a spokeswoman for labor watchdog the Center for Union Facts, said activist front groups often misuse research to advance their ideological goals.

“For years, unions have used flawed ‘research’ to support their organizing campaigns, so it’s no surprise to see Jobs with Justice involved in this project,” she told the Free Beacon. “What is surprising is that the city of San Francisco and UC Santa Cruz would lend their names to this charade.”

Other gig economy studies dispute Jobs with Justice’s findings. A Cornell University study published Monday found that 96 percent of Uber and Lyft drivers in Seattle drove less than 40 hours a week. It further found that 92 percent made more than Seattle’s minimum wage of $16.39, with the media driver earning $23.25 per hour after deducting expenses.

Jobs with Justice and Gig Workers Rising did not respond to requests for comment.

Collin AndersonCollin Anderson is a staff writer for the Washington Free Beacon. He graduated from the University of Missouri, where he studied politics. He is originally from St. Louis and now lives in Arlington, VA. His email address is anderson@freebeacon.com.



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Why the Uber driver case has the potential to alter Canada’s gig economy forever

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Article content continued

Heller was a driver for UberEats who argued that he was an employee, not an independent contractor. That meant Uber owed him overtime, vacation, holiday pay, as well as other entitlements.

The Supreme Court didn’t answer the question of whether Heller and other Uber drivers were employees or not, so in that respect the real issue lies ahead. But it did remove an important roadblock, paving the way for a potentially $400 million lawsuit.

Tucked away in the contractor agreement that every Uber driver must sign before they can start working is an arbitration clause.

The clause required drivers to bring any problems to arbitration in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and not to an Ontario court. The arbitration in Amsterdam would cost around $14,000 in administrative fees up front, as well as the cost of transport and legal representation in the Netherlands. Something no Uber driver could even possibly afford. Take Heller himself, who earns around $400 to $600 a week for 40 or more hours of work.

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Gig Economy Ballot Measure Fails Workers, Labor Groups Say (1)

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Daily Labor Report®

July 7, 2020, 8:45 PM

A California ballot measure supported by ride-hailing and delivery companies would lower workers’ wages and limit the power of legislators to institute new labor protections, according to a new report from two labor advocacy groups.

Proposition 22, known as the “Protect App-Based Drivers and Services Act,” will appear before California voters in November and is backed by $110 million from Uber, Lyft, Postmates, Instacart and Doordash. The companies say their workers want to preserve their status as independent contractors, while the National Employment Law Project and the Partnership for Working Families counter that the proposition would roll back existing protections under a state law giving certain gig workers…

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