Connect with us

Economy

Gold standard cyber security in the ‘gig economy’

Published

on

David Higgins, EMEA Technical Director, CyberArk.

David Higgins, EMEA Technical Director, CyberArk.

The ‘gig economy’ is described as many things. On the one extreme, it is depicted as symptomatic of the decline in the traditional nine-to-five day job with a stable income, while on the other, it is viewed as the jet fuel powering the new world economy. 

This new economy is driven by the increasing trend whereby companies hire independent contractors and freelancers, instead of full-time employees, paying them for each individual ‘gig’ they do.

It certainly holds a lot of promise for this continent, and has in fact been dubbed ‘the future of work in Africa’ by the Centre for Global Development, mainly due to the fact that the vast majority of the continent’s workforce are self-employed and freelancers.

As with elsewhere on the continent, this approach also holds true for South Africa, as despite an unemployment rate that remains in the doldrums, analysts suggest the gig economy can play a big role in alleviating the problem of joblessness in the country.

While the typical gig economy worker is usually, as an example, described as a part-time Uber or Deliveroo driver, the fact is that IT contracting is a very common gig economy role. In fact, even traditional retail and corporate powerhouses now comprise a mix of full-time, part-time and short-term workers. This ensures they can remain nimble, cost-effective, and able to adapt to changing market conditions in a fast-paced, technology-led environment.

It is unsurprising that a large portion of the gig economy is dedicated to IT, since it is in line with how modern enterprises approach IT in general. Being able to deploy more or less IT expertise as the situation demands is akin to usage of cloud services. It’s quick, it’s flexible, and it meets the changing needs of the business.

One thing that it is not, though, is inherently secure. The risk model has shifted from a model built around controlled environments; ie, corporate networks.The perimeter – the first line of defence – was a known quantity and yes, it had holes, but generally IT departments were aware of where the weak points were. Now, the perimeter is at best distributed, and at worst non-existent. Put bluntly, the risk is that companies can no longer enforce security on the end device, as they may have no jurisdiction or control over it.

The challenge arises because IT workers perform some of the more crucial roles in 21st century organisations, since every business relies on information and technology in order to function. It’s assumed that large quantities of critical data, and at least a few critical assets, will need to be stored and managed in order for the business to serve customers, meet manufacturing deadlines and more. Therefore, it is common that IT employees are subject to strict security oversight.

However, when these roles are performed by remote third-parties, short-term contractors or otherwise not by permanent, trusted staff that are office-based, security simply has to adapt to this new way of working. After all, as flexible workers plug into an organisation’s network and access sensitive company systems from outside the physical perimeter of the office, these organisations need to ensure they have strict security protocols in place to mitigate the elevated risk that this entails.

They also need to ensure that remote gig workers are only accessing what they need to, instead of trusting them with sweeping access to everything. Risk factors include accessing networks from personal devices that lack enterprise-grade security, or from home networks that could be easily compromised. In this scenario we are far away from a world where security teams are able to enforce policy on devices within the traditional network. Now, often they will have no control at all over the device being used by the external party to connect in and, similarly, not being able to ensure the security of the location where the device is connecting from; for instance, a home WiFi network.

According to CyberArk global research, 90% of enterprises allow third-party vendors access to their critical systems and 72% put third-party access in their top 10 security risks. This indicates the problem is widespread and the risk is understood.

The real issue, then, is whether it is acted upon. If not, gig economy workers put themselves and their employers at risk of data breaches, leaks of confidential information and more. However, recent advances in technology mean the shortcomings of older ones – like virtual private networks (VPNs) – in securing remote workers can now be overcome.

Some of the ways to do this include using biometrics, Zero Trust and just-in-time provisioning, all of which can and should be employed to reliably authenticate remote vendor access to the most sensitive parts of the corporate network. In the gig economy environment, where endpoint devices have disparate levels of security and the office environment can be a café, car or home office, it is clear that cyber security needs to match the flexibility of modern working. The place where organisations can reliably enforce policy is at the point of connection and the access that they require into systems. This needs to be recognised and implemented.

Technology is ultimately the glue that holds the gig economy together, building platforms that enable the agile and flexible matching of supply and demand, and the analytics to optimise it all. It connects freelancers with their clients and businesses with the skills they need. It is obvious that remote working is only going to continue to grow – possibly spurred to new heights by the COVID-19 lockdown – which means it is imperative that organisations considering making use of the gig economy tighten up and improve their security sooner, rather than later.

Source link

Economy

Gig firms to contribute 1-2% of turnover for social security of workers

Published

on

By

Gig companies will soon have to allot one-two per cent of their annual turnover for social security funds of their workers, according to a new labour law scheduled to be tabled in the Parliament on Saturday. This is the first time that “aggregators”—ride-sharing services, food and grocery delivery, logistic services, e-market places among them”—will be asked to contribute for the social security of gig economy workers.

The Code on Social Security Bill, 2020 however, puts a cap on the total contributions companies have to make. The contribution …





Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Gig Economy Market Comprehensive Analysis, Share, Growth Forecast from 2020 to 2025

Published

on

By

Global Gig Economy Market Research Report presents the overview and in depth study of worldwide Gig Economy Market for achieving throughout understanding and business intelligence of the market with the Financial & Industrial Analysis of key players, companies, region, types, applications and its future scope in the industry till 2025.

The research report on Gig Economy market evaluates the major trends which define the industry growth in terms of the regional scope as well as the competitive landscape. It also highlights the challenges & restraints faced by the leading companies along with the key growth opportunities that will assist in business expansion.

Request Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.theresearchprocess.com/request-sample/5792

The document is also inclusive of information such as the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the revenue generation of this business sphere, further allowing for better understanding among stakeholders.


Gig Economy  Market Comprehensive Analysis, Share, Growth Forecast from 2020 to 2025

Gig Economy Market Comprehensive Analysis, Share, Growth Forecast from 2020 to 2025

Request Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.theresearchprocess.com/request-sample/5792

Key insights to COVID-19 impact analysis:

  • Worldwide COVID-19 status and subsequent economic overview.
  • Impact on demand and supply chain processes of this industry vertical.
  • Short and long term effects of Coronavirus outbreak on the industry development.

A summary of the regional terrain:

  • The report bifurcates the geographical landscape into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa, South America.
  • It offers a comprehensive overview of each of the regional market in terms of their individual growth rate over the study duration.
  • Additional data such as revenues and sales generated by every region listed is also mentioned.

Other key aspects from the Gig Economy market report:

  • As per the report, the competitive spectrum of the Gig Economy market is formulated by organizations such as Prosper,Lime,Etsy,BlaBlaCar,VaShare,Envato Studio,Fon,BHU Technology,Didi Global,Snap,Freelancer.com,Zipcar,Uber,Toptal,Stashbee,Eatwith,Lyft,Couchsurfing,PeoplePerHour,Spotahome,Care.como,E-stronger,Silvernest,Upwork,Fiverr,Steam,Hubble,Home Away,Omni,Airbnb,JustPark andAirtasker.
  • Crucial insights such as company profile, product offerings, production capabilities, gross margins, pricing patterns and overall market share held by each firm is offered.
  • Meanwhile, the product landscape of the Gig Economy market is split into Asset-Sharing Services,Transportation-Based Services,Professional Services,Household & Miscellaneous Services (HGHM) andOthers.
  • Data pertaining to volume and revenue predictions of every product fragment over the forecast period is documented.
  • Additional details including production patterns, market share and estimated growth rate of all the product types is enumerated.
  • The application scope of the Gig Economy market comprises of Traffic,Electronic,Accommodation,Food and Beverage,Tourism,Education andOthers.
  • The report measures the market share of every application segment and subsequently predicts their respective growth rate over the estimated timeframe.
  • It also elaborates on the industry supply chain as well as the other competition trends.
  • The study conducts a detailed SWOT as well as five Porter’s analysis in order to allow for better decision-making during investment evaluation.

Major highlights of the Gig Economy market report:

  • The impact of COVID-19 on revenue streams for Gig Economy market players.
  • Calculations of total sales value and total market revenue.
  • Deteriorating trends in the industry.
  • The estimated growth rate of the Gig Economy market.
  • Detailed information on major distributors, retailers, and traders.

Key findings of the report:

  • Intricate assessment of the competitive landscape of the Gig Economy Market
  • Country-specific analysis of the supply-demand ration for the Soundbar different geographies
  • Influence of technological advancements on the Gig Economy Market
  • SWOT analysis of each company profiled in the report

Request Customization on This Report @ https://www.theresearchprocess.com/request-for-customization/5792

Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Collaboration in the Gig Economy

Published

on

By

September 18, 2020

Utmost Software Inc. was the judges’ pick among four workforce ecosystem technology startups presenting in a competition styled after the television show Shark Tank on Thursday. The event was part of the Collaboration in the Gig Economy virtual conference bringing together staffing firms, buyers and HR tech.

All four finalists were chosen from a number of firms to present before a panel of four judges, who picked their top startup.

Utmost provides software that enables enterprise firms to track their extended workforces, which include contingent workers, consultants, contractors and freelancers, among others. Unlike VMS providers, which are typically supplier-paid, the company has a set pricing model that is paid by enterprise firms themselves.

Utmost is also native to Workday and focuses exclusively on Workday customers. In addition, Workday is an investor in the company and Utmost co-founder and COO Dan Beck himself comes from Workday.

That relationship was one thing that caught judges’ attention.

“I like the business, it’s got a built-in customer base,” said Jai Shekhawat, one of the Shark judges. Shekhawat is also founder and former CEO of SAP Fieldglass. However, he did question why Utmost chose its pricing model when enterprise firms are more accustomed to the VMS supplier-paid model.

“I think he has a bright future ahead of him; not easy, but I wish him all the best,” Shekhawat said.

Timing, thoughtfulness and focus were also cited by the other three judges:

  • “Although there was something timely in everything we saw today, Utmost, in particular, I think is really timely to what enterprise customers, HR executives, hiring managers are trying to solve right now,” said Rebecca Henderson, CEO and executive board member at Randstad nv.
  • “All of the startups were really interesting,” said Pete Flint, managing partner of NFX, a venture capital firm. “Utmost stood out, just their thoughtfulness, their experience, their distribution; I think that really stood out. This is a terrific opportunity; it’s a burning need for many enterprises.”
  • “The criteria of innovation, market opportunity and the quality of the presentations made it really tough because some may be more innovative than others and some might have a bigger market opportunity,” said Gary Swart, partner at Polaris Partners, an investment firm. “I think Dan’s focus was a differentiator. The fact that there is not only an innovative solution but a focused go-to-market, not trying to boil the ocean and tackle too much.”

The other finalists presenting to the Shark Tank panel were:

  • Emma El-Karout, founder and CEO of One Circle, a digital community of on-demand HR freelancers.
  • Matthew Mottola, co-founder and CEO of Venture L. The company is described as a Shopify for running freelance businesses that enables freelancers to scale their operations.
  • Alexander Torrenegra, CEO of Torre, a professional network that is friendly for both knowledge workers and blue-collar workers that uses programmatic automatic matching for jobs.

The Collaboration in the Gig Economy Conference ends today.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2019 Gigger.news.