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Meghan Markle’s BFF Jessica Mulroney is FIRED from TV gig for ‘racist’ remarks

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Meghan Markle‘s best friend Jessica Mulroney has had her Netflix reality series cancelled and has been fired from her job as a bridal marketing specialist, following ‘racist’ remarks she made in a ‘white privilege’ row with a black social media influencer.

The cancellation of Mulroney’s show was confirmed in a tweet by CTV on Thursday evening, who said the recent actions of the I Do, Redo host had conflicted with their ‘commitment to diversity and equality’.

‘Bell Media and CTV encourages our entire team including on-air talent to practice respect, inclusivity and allyship as we pledge to work better and more openly to listen to and amplify black voices, and not minimize them,’ the statement began.

‘Because recent conduct by one of our shows hosts, Jessica Mulroney, conflicts with our commitment to diversity and equality, CTV has removed ‘I DO REDO’ from all Bell Media channels and platforms effective immediately.’ 

Hours later, Canadian department store Hudson’s Bay announced on Instagram that ‘in light of recent events’ they too would be distancing themselves from Mulroney,  firing her as their fashion and bridal specialist.

‘Over the past week Hudson’s Bay has committed to doing better,’ the statement read. ‘As we move forward, our leadership associates and ambassadors must reflect our brand inclusivity, equality and respect for all. We will not tolerate anything less.’  

The succession of bad news follows an emotional video posted by Toronto-based influencer Sasha Exeter on Wednesday, who claimed Mulroney had threatened her during an argument about ‘speaking up’ against racism that had left her ‘paralyzed in fear’. 

Meghan Markle 's best friend Jessica Mulroney has had her Netflix reality series cancelled and has been fired from her job as a bridal marketing specialist, following 'racist' remarks she made in a 'white privilege' row with a black social media influencer

Meghan Markle ‘s best friend Jessica Mulroney has had her Netflix reality series cancelled and has been fired from her job as a bridal marketing specialist, following ‘racist’ remarks she made in a ‘white privilege’ row with a black social media influencer 

Exeter said Mulroney had ‘taken offence to a very generic call to action’ posted online, causing the two women to argue about the topics of white privilege and racism.

The influencer claims the mother-of-three had sent her a series of offensive messages that resulted in her saying: ‘I have also spoken to companies and people about the way you have treated me unfairly. You think your voice matters. Well it only matters if you express it with kindness and without shaming people who are simply trying to learn. Good luck.’ 

Exeter said the exchanges left her feeling ‘paralyzed in fear,’ wondering what Mulroney was saying to her brand partners or potential brands she might want to work with. 

In a comment posted on the video clip, Mulroney said she was ‘unequivocally sorry’,  adding that being Meghan Markle’s ‘closest friend’ has ‘deeply educated’  he about race.

‘As I told you privately, I have lived a very public and personal experience with my closest friend where race was front and centre. It was deeply educational,’ Mulroney responded.

Jessica shared a behind-the-scene photo of herself wearing a stylish off-the-shoulder navy dress at the wrap party for I Do, Redo

Jessica shared a behind-the-scene photo of herself wearing a stylish off-the-shoulder navy dress at the wrap party for I Do, Redo 

DailyMail.com has contacted Mulroney for comment, though no answer was yielded by the time of publication.

She posted another apology to Exeter Thursday, this time on her own Instagram page, insisting the former athlete had ‘rightfully called me out for not doing enough when it came to engaging in the important and difficult conversation around race and injustice in our society.

‘I took it personally and that was wrong. I know I need to do better,’ she continued. ‘I want to say from my heart that every more of my apologies to Sasha over the course of the last two weeks privately, and again both publicly and privately today is true. 

‘I did not intend in any way to jeopardize her livelihood … for that I am sorry,’ she said. 

Mulroney’s reality show, I Do, Redo, premiered on CTV at the end of March and was also released internationally on Netflix. 

The series followed Jessica as she helped couples move on from their disastrous weddings by giving them the nuptials they’ve ‘always dreamed of.’

CTV told DailyMail.com that no decision has been made as to whether show will continue without Mulroney. The series had recently completed its first series on the network.

Canada’s longest running women’s daytime TV show, Cityline, for which Mulroney regularly featured on as a panelist, also severed ties with her Thursday, confirming to DailyMail.com she would no longer be appearing on the program as a guest expert. 

Mulroney also presents a fashion segment for ABC’s Good Morning America. The network has not yet confirmed if it will be taking any disciplinary action against the 40-year-old.

Canada's longest running women's daytime TV show, Cityline, for which Mulroney regularly featured on as a panelist (above), also severed ties with her Thursday, confirming to DailyMail.com she would no longer be appearing on the program as a guest expert.

Canada’s longest running women’s daytime TV show, Cityline, for which Mulroney regularly featured on as a panelist (above), also severed ties with her Thursday, confirming to DailyMail.com she would no longer be appearing on the program as a guest expert.

Toronto-based Influencer Sasha Exeter said she was left 'paralysed with fear' and 'stayed up days and nights' worrying about what Jessica 'could be saying to my existing brand partners, potential work, potential livelihood'

Jessica Mulroney pictured hosting I Do, Redo

Toronto-based Influencer Sasha Exeter said she was left ‘paralysed with fear’ and ‘stayed up days and nights’ worrying about what Jessica (right) ‘could be saying to my existing brand partners, potential work, potential livelihood’

CTV has not yet returned a DailyMail.com request for comment as to whether the show may continue without Mulroney's involvement (pictured: Mulroney's instagram post, remarking that she loves her crew)

CTV has not yet returned a DailyMail.com request for comment as to whether the show may continue without Mulroney’s involvement (pictured: Mulroney’s instagram post, remarking that she loves her crew) 

Sasha shared the lengthy video online in which she detailed her disagreement with Jessica, accusing the stylist of 'threatening her livelihood'

Sasha shared the lengthy video online in which she detailed her disagreement with Jessica, accusing the stylist of 'threatening her livelihood'

Sasha shared the lengthy video online in which she detailed her disagreement with Jessica, accusing the stylist of ‘threatening her livelihood’ 

In Exeter’s video clip, which was shared with her 58,000 Instagram followers on June 10, the influencer explained: ‘Very early on in this, I was very vocal about wanting my peers with an online presence to speak up, stand up and use their voice for good to help combat what’s going on with this race war.’

She said she had made an effort ‘not to call out anyone directly’, but said Mulroney, who ‘used to be an acquaintance’, took ‘offence to a very generic call to action’.  

Exeter said Mulroney went on to ‘lash out’ at her and said the ‘very problematic antics’ escalated until the stylist sent over what Exeter felt was ‘a threat in writing.’ 

Exeter said: ‘I’m by no means calling Jess a racist, but she is very well aware of her wealth, her perceived power and privilege because of the colour of her skin. 

‘And that my friends, gave her the momentary confidence to come for my livelihood in writing. Textbook white privilege really.’

The influencer accused Mulroney of ‘never wanting to stand up and use her voice in the first place’ and ‘not understanding why she needed to’.

Exeter suggested that Mulroney felt ‘sharing that this really wasn’t a problem that she wanted to share on her social channels’, used ‘excuses that she would be bullied by the public and media’, and ‘claimed her show was more important to promote.’

She said she felt that Mulroney went on to ‘threaten her livelihood’ by suggesting she would be contacting brands and companies Exeter worked with about the disagreement.

In a comment on the post, Jessica said she was 'unequivocally sorry' for what had happened  and wrote that she had 'lived a very public experience with my closest friend where race was front and centre'

In a comment on the post, Jessica said she was ‘unequivocally sorry’ for what had happened  and wrote that she had ‘lived a very public experience with my closest friend where race was front and centre’

Mulroney posted another apology to Exeter Thursday, this time on her own Instagram page, insisting the former athlete had 'rightfully called me out for not doing enough when it came to engaging in the important and difficult conversation around race and injustice in our society.

Mulroney posted another apology to Exeter Thursday, this time on her own Instagram page, insisting the former athlete had ‘rightfully called me out for not doing enough when it came to engaging in the important and difficult conversation around race and injustice in our society

Exeter said: ‘I’m still shaking my head at this attempt and the audacity she had. 

‘Not only is Mulroney very well aware of her white privilege but just like her fellow Canadian Amy Cooper, she spewed out that threat so effortlessly…

‘But I think what makes this situation really horrendous is the threat or claim she was going ahead to speak to brands or companies that I potentially haven’t worked with or could possibly work with. That is a threat. That’s a threat to my livelihood.’  

‘For her to threaten me? A single mother, a single black mother, during a racial pandemic? Blows my mind, it is absolutely unbelievable.’

Exeter continued to say that she felt Mulroney ‘realised she had screwed up big time’ and ‘that resulted in a lot of back pedalling’.

Meanwhile the influencer said: ‘Amidst all this craziness, I remained paralysed with fear. 

‘I stayed up days and nights wondering what could she be saying to my existing brand partners, potential work, potential livelihood. What could this mean for my career?

‘I spoke to my parents, who were legitimately stressed and worried about how this would affect me if I stood up for myself.’

Details of the argument have emerged just a week after Jessica announced she would be taking a break from social media

Details of the argument have emerged just a week after Jessica announced she would be taking a break from social media

The influencer went on to claim she had been sent a private message from Jessica suggesting she would file a lawsuit against her

The influencer went on to claim she had been sent a private message from Jessica suggesting she would file a lawsuit against her 

Hours after posting her initial video about her argument with Jessica, Sasha claimed to have been sent further messages 'threatening a law suit to try and shut you up'

Hours after posting her initial video about her argument with Jessica, Sasha claimed to have been sent further messages ‘threatening a law suit to try and shut you up’ 

Exeter said that the ‘only take away is this sh** needs to stop right now….You cannot be posting that you stand in solidarity, while attempting to silence somebody via text.’   

Mulroney went on to comment on the post, apologising for her behaviour, writing: ‘You are right when you say this sh** needs to stop. As leaders, we need to join hands and call out wrongs.

‘I know we have different experiences. And that is something that, even in the course of a heated argument, I need to acknowledge and understand.

‘I am unequivocally sorry for not doing that with you, and for any hurt I caused.’

She added that she had had a ‘very public’ experience with ‘her closest friend’ where race was ‘front and centre’, adding: ‘It was deeply educational. I learned a  lot from it.

‘I promise to continue to learn and listen on how I can use my privilege to elevate and support black voices.’ 

But hours later, after posting an apology, Exeter revealed Mulroney had messaged her privately online.

Sharing a video on her Instagram stories, she commented: ‘Here is what happens when you call out somebody with privilege. They publicly make an apology or statement and privately, behind closed doors, they send you a threat of filing a lawsuit against you.

The Canadian stylist has previously slammed 'racist bullies' when she appeared to reference the trolling Meghan (seen in 2016)

The Canadian stylist has previously slammed ‘racist bullies’ when she appeared to reference the trolling Meghan (seen in 2016) 

‘I’m not sure what is going on, because I thought I was very clear yesterday in my video yesterday that I’m not going to be silenced and I’m not going to shut up.

‘I am going to move forward and do what I need to do, to protect myself at this point. But I’m feeling confident in doing so, knowing I have the truth. The unequivocal truth.

‘I don’t know what’s worth here, her using her perceived power to try to threaten my livelihood or using her resources to try to shut me up, but whatever the case is, it needs to stop.’

She went on to share a snap of her Instagram messages, one of which appeared to be from Mulroney and read: ‘Liable suit [sic]. Good luck.’ 

Last week Mulroney said she was taking a break from social media, after revealing that ‘someone dear to her told her to stand up to racism’.

Mulroney, who lives in Toronto with husband Ben Mulroney, 44, twins John and Brian, 9, and 7-year-old Ivy, took to Instagram to reveal she was ‘taking a week off to educate herself’.

The Canadian stylist has previously slammed ‘racist bullies’ when she appeared to reference the trolling Meghan was suffering. 

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How a saucy local side-gig led to an extra kick for food everywhere

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PITTSBORO — Around the turn of the century, Page Skelton was working a corporate job at a telecommunications company in Research Triangle Park. In his spare time, though, he was concocting the recipe for a sauce that would eventually be tasted around the country.

He bottled it in Mason jars and sold it to his office buddies.

“I was doing what I thought I was supposed to be doing, and that was working my way up the corporate ladder,” Page said.

One day, his wife Caroline, who was working on her Master’s degree at UNC’s Kenan Flagler Business School, told him that maybe it was time for a change.

“I just picked up the phone one day and said to Page, ‘Hey what if you left your corporate job and did this full time?’ and he quit the next day. So we never looked back,” she said.

Now Page and Caroline, along with their son Harry, 13, are running the hot sauce business Cackalacky out of a warehouse that used to be a Chevrolet dealership in Pittsboro. Made up of just the three of them, the company fulfills internet orders to sauce-lovers all over the country, and Page attributes much of their luck and success to their decision to settle down in Chatham County.

“It felt really organic, the way the business community and the local community at large just really seemed to get what we’re doing,” he said.

“It didn’t require any explaining,” added Caroline.

Back in the days when Page was still making and bottling the sauce himself, he took a few jars to a party to share with his friends.

“We’re standing around the fire pit and one of my buddies is like, ‘Hey man, pass me some of that Cackalacky sauce.’”

Page froze. “What’d you call it?” he responded.

The name stuck, and the family trademarked it soon after that. Years later, Page now sees Cackalacky bumper stickers on cars while he’s stuck in traffic, and thinks about how lucky he is that Caroline convinced him to leave that telecommunications job.

“We’re not just some multinational conglomerate putting some stuff in a bottle or on a t-shirt or wherever, saying ‘buy our stuff and your dollars go somewhere,’” Page said. “You’re actually supporting our family.”

The company’s flagship product, Cackalacky Spice Sauce, is made with sweet potatoes and the brand’s “secret spice.”

“It’s not incredibly hot, which is kind of the whole point,” Page said, but then added, “A lot of people would say, ‘Hey man, you got anything hotter than that?’”

So they worked up the Cackalacky Hotter Sauce, with Carolina Reaper peppers that provide an extra kick.

When Page decided to devote himself to his new business, he spent years hustling around the country at trade shows — in Baltimore, Austin, Houston, New York and other cities — where he would pitch his sauce to customers. They were asked to cook for the Panthers Super Bowl tailgate party in 2004, and were able to start selling their products and merchandise at the then-popular, but now-closed Chapel Hill food store Southern Season.

Page credits Caroline and her business savviness for the brand’s explosion. She once offered him a piece of advice that would go on to define their route forward.

“Caroline said to me years ago, if you want to stay in business, you’re gonna focus on selling locally,” he said.

And so they did. They moved the operation from Chapel Hill to Chatham County, where they’ve been stationed for nearly a decade, and Page said he’s proud of the ties he has built with the community.

“I don’t know if it’s a case of Pittsboro aligning with fate or providing more opportunities for us, or both. It felt like people here really got what we’re doing,” he said. “People recognizing each other and lifting each other up, and that’s what’s been great about Chatham County. It just feels right here.”

A few years ago, Page said he launched an expansion with “a big box chain” that put him in 13 locations across a few southern states, but when that led to him and his family not seeing each other as much, they decided that bigger is not necessarily better.

“Part of our success is knowing when to say no,” he said. “It’s a balance between taking advantage of opportunities, and not just jumping on any opportunity that comes along.”

Page started Cackalacky as an adventurous side-gig. It soon became his career, and now, for Caroline and him, it’s a generational pursuit. Their son Harry is involved in the business, pitching ideas for products and helping with social media outreach, and they look forward to the day when they can pass the reins to him.

“It went from a kind of whimsical idea,” Page said, “to this adventure seeking quest, to a little more humble ends, to now —”

“Now we’re looking at it as, ‘Could it be generational?’” Caroline added.

Harry completes the team of three, who by themselves handle most of the business’ needs.

“I’m looking forward to eventually taking control and actually running the company one day once I’m an adult,” Harry, a rising 8th-grader at Pollard Middle School, said.

Cackalacky has defined its place in the community by teaming up with other local businesses. Together with Bear Creek Brews, they make Cackalacky Hot Red-Rye, and donate a portion of the sales proceeds to CORA, the Chatham Outreach Alliance, which provides food to those in need in the county.

With Cheerwine, they developed a “sweet ‘n savory ‘tomato based’ dipping-grilling sauce & marinade,” made with both the Cheerwine formula and the “secret Cackalacky spice blend,” according to the company’s website.

In the executive boardroom of Cheerwine’s headquarters in Salisbury, Page pitched the soda brand on a one-time collaboration, but left the meeting with an agreement to start a longstanding partnership.

“We just really hit it off with the folks at Cheerwine,” Page said.

Both companies are family-owned N.C. businesses. He said when the deal was struck, that was the moment in which “we went from having big dreams to realizing big dreams.”

Cackalacky collaborates on a coffee blend with Aromatic Roasters — located next door, just north of Pittsboro — and the “Cackalacky Chop” sandwich is available at 22 Biscuitville locations.

The company’s sauces and nuts are available at Lowes Foods, Food Lion, Harris Teeter, Wegmans and Publix. Locally, Cackalacky products can be found at a number of locations throughout North Carolina, like the Chatham Marketplace, Carolina Brewery, Carolina Cravings and Pittsboro Feed. Products can be bought online at cackalacky.com.

Despite the economic effects the COVID-19 pandemic has had on county businesses, Cackalacky has managed to power through the changing times. Their business model is widely built around internet orders and deliveries, so it’s been able to withstand the pressure.

“We’ve definitely seen an uptick in the grocery business since people are eating at home,” Caroline said. “We’ve been O.K. We haven’t had too much of an interruption, just some changes.”

Despite his transformation from selling mason jars of homemade sauce on his lunch breaks, to collaborating with Cheerwine and other staples of N.C. business, Page likes to think humbly about his business, and above all, he just loves to make sauce.

“I don’t know if I had the idea to start a business, or if I just wanted to make a really good sauce,” he said. “I’ve never taken the time to analyze our customer data, but it’s a pretty broad spectrum of people, and I feel the same way about Chatham County.”



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Sonic Youth, Desolation Center 1985: 500 tabs of acid, one life-changing gig | Music

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In 1983, 20-year-old promoter Stuart Swezey was sick of his gigs getting shut down by Los Angeles cops. On a road trip across Mexico he had an epiphany: move them out to the desert. Under the name Desolation Center, he booked local post-punk bands Minutemen and Savage Republic, hired some school buses and drove people out to the uninhabited windswept landscape where the bands played on a dried up riverbed with socks over their microphones to keep sand out. The following year, the German industrial outfit Einstürzende Neubauten played in a more sheltered location in a canyon; there was also an explosive performance from Survival Research Laboratories who decided to make bombs and blow up the discarded fridges that had been fly-tipped there.

By 1985 Swezey had achieved all he set out to with these unique shows – attendees had described the intensity of the Neubauten performance as akin to a religious experience – but he decided to throw one last party with experimental guitar outfit Sonic Youth, the psych-punk band Meat Puppets, local glam-punkers Redd Kross and Psi Com (fronted by a pre-Jane’s Addiction Perry Farrell).

That date of 5 January was selected because it was the first full moon of the new year. About 300 people turned up in downtown LA, where they were given directions to the secret desert location or could hop on a school bus and be driven there.

“It was a desolate and really confusing location to get to,” remembers Sonic Youth guitarist Lee Ranaldo, “driving down all these barely existent dirt roads.” Support band Redd Kross got so lost that by the time they arrived they had to perform last.

Sonic Youth and the Desolation Center crowd



‘We were kicking up dust storms as we played’ … Sonic Youth and the Desolation Center crowd. Photograph: Alan Peak

“It was completely makeshift,” Ranaldo remembers of the set-up. “We were nestled in between some sort of rocky mountain walls and they just demarcated an area where the bands played. We stood right on the sand, kicking up dust storms as we played. There was no backstage. I don’t even remember there being toilets.” There was also no food, no bar, no merch stall, and people had to sign a liability disclaimer so that they wouldn’t sue the promoter if they got hurt. “It had an element of danger that normal events never have,” says Ranaldo.

Anticipation was high for the New York band who had never played a show on the west coast before. “We really didn’t know what it was going to turn into,” Ranaldo recalls. “We had no expectations of what was going to go down.”

It was dusk as Sonic Youth started, and Ranaldo felt a palpable intensity from the audience. “The crowd was completely absorbed by what we were doing,” he says. People gathered around the band in a circle, with everyone on the same level in the sand. “The exchange was really intimate. Plus, nobody had seen us play before and what we were doing at that time was pretty unique. A lot of people were kind of stunned by it, with us using screwdrivers to play and the strange tunings on our guitars.”

As the band hurtled through their set, with frenzied guitars buzzing, screeching and ricocheting off the mountainous backdrop, the audience became even more transfixed. It turns out someone had brought 500 hits of LSD – enough for everyone in attendance. “Aside from the four of us in Sonic Youth, everyone else was tripping,” says Ranaldo. “Everybody I’ve ever met who was at that concert was dosed.”

The combination was a potent one as the furious assault of tracks such as Death Valley 69 surged into the now pitch-black and icy-cool desert night. The band knew something special had happened. “There really was no show like that that we ever did again,” says Ranaldo. After Sonic Youth finished and the Meat Puppets came on, they asked for the lighting to be switched off and performed by moonlight as hundreds of revellers pulsed along to the music in hallucinogenic synchronicity.

There’s a long-lasting legacy to that night. A year later, in 1986, Burning Man started, with co-founder John Law citing the shows as an influence, and Perry Farrell was inspired enough to later found Lollapalooza. In 2018, Swezey made a documentary about it all, Desolation Center.

But, even though these events turned out to be a blueprint for other American festivals, Ranaldo says they connected on a deeper, more significant level. “This was much more of an art event,” he says. “It was completely guerrilla style. These days festivals are all so sanitised but this was an anything-goes situation. The legacy of that night is a bit like when people claim to have seen the Velvet Underground. It has that kind of legendary quality to it.”

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Ringo marks 80th at online gig with Beatles hits, celebrity tributes

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Ringo Starr, performing here in 2019 during the Woodstock 50th anniversary, is holding an online birthday party to fete his 80th year
Ringo Starr, performing here in 2019 during the Woodstock 50th anniversary, is holding an online birthday party to fete his 80th year

LOS ANGELES – Ringo Starr held an online 80th birthday bash Tuesday with a little help from his celebrity friends — and a number of classic Beatles songs — in aid of causes including Black Lives Matter.

But fans hoping for a virtual reunion between Starr and fellow surviving Beatle Paul McCartney were left disappointed, as the celebration concluded with an archive clip of the pair performing “Helter Skelter.”

Normally Starr marks each passing year with live performances that include fellow musicians and hundreds of fans, but the pandemic forced a rethink this time.

“As most of you know, I’m fond of a good birthday party… but this is a bad year to host a get-together of any kind,” said the British musician, sitting behind a drum kit wearing a colorful face mask adorned with the peace sign.

“So I’m celebrating with my friends in a new way this year — we’re going to have to keep our distance due to the coronavirus.”

Famous pals from musicians Sheryl Crow and Kenny Loggins to filmmaker David Lynch recorded vocals and video tributes, as Starr introduced hits from the Beatles’ back catalog as well as his own.

“Come Together,” “All You Need is Love” and “With a Little Help From My Friends” were among the tracks aired in an eclectic mix of archive concert footage and home recordings watched live by some 130,000 fans.

At the end of the festivities, Starr announced “We’ve got Paul… and I’m even playing with him!” — before introducing footage of the pair shot in Starr’s adopted hometown Los Angeles last year.

But with McCartney seemingly billed in advance promotions as the show’s top guest, some Beatles fans took to social media to vent their disappointment.

“Where were you Paul? Very disappointing. #peaceandlove” wrote Chris Durso.

“Very very disappointed. Now we know. Ringo is the God,” tweeted Ann Olsson.

McCartney did send a tweet earlier in the day wishing “Happy birthday SIR RICHARD alias RINGO. Have a great day my long time buddy!”

The duo still play together on occasion, including at the Dodger Stadium gig last year as part of McCartney’s “Freshen Up” tour.

– ‘Peace and Love’ –

Ben Harper, Dave Grohl and Sheila E. were among the celebrities who recorded musical segments for Starr’s online party.

The event encouraged donations to the Black Lives Matter Global Network for the fight to “end all this racist violence,” Starr explained, as well as The David Lynch Foundation, MusiCares and WaterAid.

Documentary footage reflected on the Beatles’ refusal to play before a segregated audience in Jacksonville, Florida during their famous 1964 US tour.

“Black Lives Matter. Stand up and make your voice heard,” said Starr, before noting the major influence of Black artists including Little Richard on the Beatles’ sound.

Ahead of the bash NASA’s Curiosity Rover tweeted Starr birthday wishes from space.

“Happy 80th, Ringo! Here’s my view of Earth (and Venus) from the surface of Mars where I’m thinking about your message of Peace and Love, and how in good times and in tough ones, we all get by with a little help from our friends,” it said.

Known for his easy-going personality and humor, Starr rocketed to global fame in the early 1960s and helped change the face of pop music forever as part of the Beatles — still perhaps the world’s most famous band.

After the group’s break-up, Starr emerged as a band leader in the late 1980s with his All Starr Band.

In an interview with Rolling Stone published Tuesday, the newly-minted octogenarian talked about his recent turn to health as he heads into his ninth decade.

Starr said he works out anywhere from three to six times a week, goes for long walks and maintains a vegetarian diet — eating “broccoli with everything and blueberries every morning.”

He said he hasn’t really left his Los Angeles home in some 11 weeks during the pandemic, inviting an engineer over just once for a jam session.

“I do a bit of that and I have a paint room, a little art room. And I’m going in there, painting and doing stuff. And I love to sit in the sun. I love LA. I love the brightness and hanging out.

“That’s all we’re doing.”

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