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Suspicious side gig: Nearly 400 state officials have concurrent roles at state firms – National

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The Indonesian Ombudsman has found that hundreds of state officials, including active members of the police and military, sit as commissioners of state-owned enterprises, resulting in what it says is a conflict of interest and poor accountability.

In a statement issued on Sunday, Ombudsman member Alamsyah Saragih said that data collected by his office indicated that 397 state officials had concurrent roles at state firms, while 167 others had secured positions at subsidiaries of those companies.

Of those found to have second positions at state firms, 65 percent are active members of the National Police, the Indonesian Military, the State Intelligence Agency (BIN), the Attorney General’s Office (AGO), the State Audit Agency (BPKP) or local administrations, according to the Ombudsman.

In addition, staff members at 16 state universities, including the University of Indonesia and Gadjah Mada University, were found to have taken simultaneous roles at state enterprises.

Alamsyah said the phenomenon was partly the result of a legal loophole in the amended Government Regulation No. 53/2010 on civil servant discipline, which supposedly did not forbid state employees from assuming secondary roles as commissioners of state enterprises or any of their subsidiaries unless those employees served as active members of political parties.

He said Law No. 25/2009 on public service – which, on paper, prohibits civil servants from securing concurrent positions at state firms – had often been deflected by those holding both positions on the basis of semantics.

“The Ombudsman had found that the clash between the two regulations has resulted in an [unfair] recruitment process, ethical negligence, conflicts of interest, discrimination and poor accountability,” Alamsyah said, adding that his office would officially write to President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and the State-Owned Enterprises Ministry about its concerns.



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In Season Of Strikes For Gig Workers, Now Swiggy Delivery Execs In Noida Rebel

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After strikes in Chennai and Hyderabad in the last 30 days, Swiggy’s delivery executives in Noida have gone on strike to protest against low wages

The delivery workers are demanding a minimum payout of INR 35 per order and restoration of monthly incentives, among other demands

Similar demands were also raised by Swiggy’s delivery partners in Hyderabad, who went on an indefinite strike last week

With similar demands as their counterparts in Chennai and Hyderabad, delivery executives with Indian foodtech unicorn Swiggy in Noida, on Thursday (September 17), went on a strike to protest against low wages. 

The strike comes just days after Swiggy’s delivery partners went on an indefinite strike in Hyderabad to protest against the low wages and to press their demands. 

In Noida, the protesting delivery workers are demanding a minimum payout per order of INR 35, a minimum payout of INR 20 per batched order (when the driver has to make more than one delivery in a single trip), and a payout at the rate of INR 10 per km after the worker has travelled more than 5 km for making a delivery, among other things.

The delivery partners in Noida, affiliated with the All India Gig Workers Union (AIGWU), have also demanded the reinstatement of monthly incentives of up to INR 3,000 for full-time work and INR 2,000 for part-time work. 

Further, the delivery partners are also demanding extra wages for deliveries made while it rains, or in nights, as also, compensation for waiting time at restaurants, while the order is being prepared. 

“Swiggy delivery workers are taking extraordinary risks by delivering food and essentials to people during this pandemic. The company cannot reward us by cutting our payouts and incentives. Our demands should be met at the earliest,” reads the letter stating the demands of AIGWU for Swiggy’s delivery workers, addressed to Swiggy’s CEO Sriharsha Majety. 

The demands of the delivery workers in Noida are similar to the demands of the workers in Hyderabad, who, earlier this week, launched an indefinite strike to protest against Swiggy paying low wages to the delivery workers. 

The workers in Hyderabad have alleged that during the lockdown, their minimum payout per order reduced from INR 35 to INR 15, while the company also removed monthly incentives to the tune of INR 5,000. 

When asked about the protest of delivery workers in Hyderabad earlier this week, a Swiggy spokesperson told Inc42, “Most delivery partners in Hyderabad make over INR 45 per order, with the highest performing partners making over INR 75 per order. This INR 15 is only one of the many components of the service fee.”

“Naturally, no active delivery partners in Hyderabad have made only INR 15 per order in the last four weeks. It is important to note that the service fee per order is based on multiple factors to adequately compensate our partners including distance travelled, waiting time, customer experience, shift completion and incentives. Regular competitive benchmarking shows that these are at par, if not higher than the industry standards,” Spokesperson added.

In what has been a season of strikes for gig workers, last month, Swiggy’s delivery executives in Chennai had gone on strike to press for their demands. A few days after the strike in Chennai, Swiggy told NDTV that the company had had a positive dialogue with the protesting delivery partners and was back to serving the entire city of Chennai with its fleet of workers.

Meanwhile, the Indian government’s new draft social security code is said to have recognised gig workers, and will mandate gig economy companies to contribute to a social security fund for gig and platform workers, reported Business Standard. Approved by the Union Cabinet last week, the code, which will have several other benefits outlined for gig workers, will come up in the Parliament’s ongoing monsoon session.



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