Connect with us

Workers

Gig workers offer new services to stay in business

Published

on

For four years, freelance business consultant Maansi Gupta was happy with just a dozen clients who called her in for strategy work. Then, the covid-19 outbreak brough a lot of polite refusals from her regulars. Most were small businesses and startups who could no longer afford her consultation fees. So, Gupta, 39, pivoted to doing workshops on mindset and skillset growth, and adapting quickly to changing business circumstances. “Everyone’s talking about struggling to adapt to the changing situation, I help them with it,” says Gurugram-based Gupta.

When projects were suddenly cancelled during the lockdown, freelance consultant Masroor Lodi too quickly created 15 training modules, including one on managing personal finance, and a strategy course for top leadership teams. He’s even partnered with a yoga instructor in Bengaluru to provide de-stressing tips. While training sessions only bring in a quarter of the revenue he made earlier, he says it has put him in touch with new clients and is better than earning nothing. “The new programmes have helped us create new knowledge,” says Lodi, who is also conducting a year-long study on behavioural changes in organisations during covid-19 for a UK University.

With companies focusing on frugality and business demands changing, freelance consultants have suddenly found that their old ways of working will not bring in revenues during the pandemic. Many of them have adapted and are reinventing themselves to offer new services for a changing business environment. “Freelancers who were more risk conscious before are now trying new things,” says networking platform TapChief’s co-founder Shashank Murali.

Freelancers across the strategy, marketing and HR segments are now pivoting. “The reason for the trend is two-fold: The need for multiple sources of revenue due to economic uncertainty, and a choice to address topics that are in demand currently to ensure they can be most useful to clients,” says Chandrika Pasricha, founder and CEO of consulting platform Flexing It. “There is a greater need for digital expertise and for strategy consulting as businesses re-align to shifts in demand.”

Some gig workers have upskilled and modified their profiles. Freelance HR consultant Chhavi Mishra, 40, took online courses to add new skillsets to her portfolio. Earlier, Bengaluru-based Mishra concentrated on talent acquisition and HR strategy for multinational corporations. As recruitment dried up in large companies due to the effect of covid-19, Mishra has found that smaller enterprises are approaching her. They need help with putting in place work-from-home policies, resource mobilisation, finding skill gaps and coaching current talent.

“It has been a huge change for me. Earlier, I would choose projects based on my areas of interest. Now, I take up projects that may pay less, but give me opportunity to network,” says Mishra.

For some freelancers, covid-19 has brought in steady income. Amit Panchal, 32, who provides digital marketing consultancy services, has secured six new retainership projects as companies look to build stronger online presence. In addition, he’s now offering personal brand building for individuals on social media platforms. “My whole business model has changed. I have had to hire two people to help me,” says Panchal, who says he’s earning 60% more with the new lines of business he’s offering.

Subscribe to newsletters

* Enter a valid email

* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Source link

Workers

Gig economy to supply fifth of financial services workers by 2026

Published

on

By

Up to a fifth of workers in financial services could be gig economy employees within the next five years globally, new research by PricewaterhouseCoopers suggests (PwC).  After surveying 500 financial services businesses, the researchers found that slightly more than half expect to have more gig-based employees – such as online platform workers – over the next three to five years.  The gig economy currently supplies just 5% of talent in financial services, but PwC expects this to rise to between 15% and 20% by 2026, driven by continuous cost pressures and the need to access digitally-skilled talent.  Crowdsourcing – which typically involves using the internet to divide work between many different participants – was also highlighted as a key contributor to improve productivity by the survey respondents.  Half of businesses said they had leveraged the practice, up from 21% in 2018, of which 80% said it had added “high value” to their organisations.  John Garvey, global financial services leader at PwC US, said that COVID-19 and remote working have “opened the door to accessing talent outside of a firm’s physical location”, including outside of the country.  “What we are seeing now is a talent marketplace for gig workers in financial services, competing to take advantage of their specialist skill set and boost productivity within their businesses,” he continued.  “Leaders in the industry are looking seriously at their workforces to evaluate which roles need to be performed by permanent employees and which can be performed by gig-economy workers, contractors or even crowd-sourced on a case-by-case basis.”  However, challenges remain for financial services businesses wishing to take on gig workers, which will require overcoming several obstacles.   The survey found that the most common issues for businesses include confidentiality concerns, a lack of knowledge, regulatory risk, and overall risk avoidance.  Garvey said that few full-time employees and an increasing percentage of gig-economy talent and skills that they

Up to a fifth of workers in financial services could be gig economy employees within the next five years globally, new research by PricewaterhouseCoopers suggests (PwC).

After surveying 500 financial services businesses, the researchers found that slightly more than half expect to have more gig-based employees – such as online platform workers – over the next three to five years.

The gig economy currently supplies just 5% of talent in financial services, but PwC expects this to rise to between 15% and 20% by 2026, driven by continuous cost pressures and the need to access digitally-skilled talent.

Crowdsourcing – which typically involves using the internet to divide work between many different participants – was also highlighted as a key contributor to improve productivity by the survey respondents.

Half of businesses said they had leveraged the practice, up from 21% in 2018, of which 80% said it had added “high value” to their organisations.

John Garvey, global financial services leader at PwC US, said that COVID-19 and remote working have “opened the door to accessing talent outside of a firm’s physical location”, including outside of the country.

“What we are seeing now is a talent marketplace for gig workers in financial services, competing to take advantage of their specialist skill set and boost productivity within their businesses,” he continued.

“Leaders in the industry are looking seriously at their workforces to evaluate which roles need to be performed by permanent employees and which can be performed by gig-economy workers, contractors or even crowd-sourced on a case-by-case basis.”

However, challenges remain for financial services businesses wishing to take on gig workers, which will require overcoming several obstacles. 

The survey found that the most common issues for businesses include confidentiality concerns, a lack of knowledge, regulatory risk, and overall risk avoidance.

Garvey said that few full-time employees and an increasing percentage of gig-economy talent and skills that they can access on-demand, are making organisations far more innovative, nimble and cost-efficient.

“Many of the most valuable companies in the world share one thing in common: they have embraced the platform economy as a business model,” he added.

 

Image credit: iStock

Author: Chris Seekings

Source link

Continue Reading

Workers

Gig Workers Gather Their Own Data to Check the Algorithm’s Math

Published

on

By

Armin Samii had been biking for UberEats for a few weeks last July when he accepted a delivery he estimated would take 20 minutes, tops. But the app led him up one of the steepest hills in Pittsburgh, a 4-mile one-way trip that clocked in at an hour. Then he noticed that Uber had only paid him for 1 mile—the distance between his origin and destination as the crow flies, but not as the man bikes.

“I’d only done 20 deliveries, and this already happened to me,” Samii says. “For people who do this full-time, are they going to look this deeply into this statement? Are they ever going to find this issue?”

Samii is a software engineer. So he created a Google Chrome extension, UberCheats, that helps workers spot pay discrepancies. The extension automatically extracts the start and end points of each trip and calculates the shortest travel distance between the two. If that distance doesn’t match up with what Uber paid for, the extension marks it for closer examination.

So far, only a few hundred workers have installed UberCheats on their browsers. Samii doesn’t have access to how couriers are using the extension, but he says some have told him they’ve used it to find pay inconsistencies. Google briefly removed the extension last week when Uber flagged it as a trademark violation, but reversed its decision after Samii appealed.

The digital tool joins others popping up to help freelancers wrest back control over work directed by opaque algorithms, with pay structures that might change at any time. The need has only grown during the pandemic, which has seen companies like DoorDash, Amazon, and Instacart hire more contractors to support spikes in demand for deliveries. The expansion of the gig economy might be here to stay: The US Bureau of Labor Statistics projects the “courier and messenger” sector could grow 13 to 30 percent more by 2029 than it would have without a pandemic. Globally, up to 55 million people work as gig workers, according to the research and advocacy group Fairwork.

The projects stem from practical need. In the US, many gig workers keep track of their miles and expenses for tax purposes. But the projects also grow out of workers’ growing mistrust of the companies that pay their wages. “I knew about gig companies’ business decisions that meant they weren’t paying well,” says Samii. But he says he hadn’t thought the apps might “pay for less work than you actually did.”

The tools are particularly helpful to gig workers because of their low wages, and because it can be hard for isolated workers to share or find information about how the job pays, says Katie Wells, a research fellow at Georgetown University who studies labor. “Things are changed and hidden behind an algorithm, which makes it harder to figure out what you’re earning and spending and whether you’re getting screwed,” Wells says.

Gig workers tend to have their own ways of tracking business expenses. Some delight in spreadsheets; others keep pens and notepaper in their glove box, so they can log miles and gas spending. Still others use apps built specifically to track mileage for tax purposes, like Stride and QuickBooks Self-Employed, which drivers can set up to run in the background of their phones as they pick up passengers and deliveries.

Driver’s Seat Cooperative helps gig workers track their hours across apps—and what they’re really making.

Courtesy of Driver’s Seat Cooperative

But some workers have been drawn to homegrown tools built by other gig workers—and the idea that they might themselves profit off the information that companies collect about them. Driver’s Seat Cooperative launched in 2019 to help workers collect and analyze their own data from ride-hail and delivery apps like Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, and Instacart. More than 600 gig workers in 40 cities have pooled their information through the cooperative, which helps them decide when and where to sign on to each app to make the most money, and how much they are making, after expenses. In turn, the company hopes to sell the data to transportation agencies interested in learning more about gig work, and pass on the profits to cooperative members. Only one city agency, in San Francisco, has paid for the data thus far, for a local mobility study that sent $45,700 to Driver’s Seat.

Source link

Continue Reading

Workers

Media Advisory – Gig Workers United Step up Organizing Work with Campaign Relaunch

Published

on

By

TORONTO, Feb. 23, 2021 /CNW/ – App-based delivery workers of Toronto are organizing to take on both employers and lawmakers in the next phase of their organizing campaign. Broader in scope and even more ambitious, the new Gig Workers United campaign builds on the historic successes of Justice for Foodora Couriers, working collectively for better conditions and rights for all app delivery workers.

One year from the date of the historic Ontario Labour Relations Board decision on Foodora couriers’ right to unionize, gig worker organizers will launch the next phase of the campaign with a media conference and availability.               

WHAT:     

Campaign launch media conference



WHO:       

Brice Sopher, delivery courier, moderator 
Narada Kiondo, delivery courier 
Arash Manouchehrian, delivery courier
Jan Simpson, National President, CUPW



WHEN:     

Thursday February 25, 10 a.m.



WHERE:   

Zoom – please register at  
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Iwr46s8FReaxssMIkIKzlQ

SOURCE Canadian Union of Postal Workers

Cision View original content: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/February2021/23/c0238.html

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2019 Gigger.news.