Connect with us

Workers

Amazon puts out call for gig workers to pick orders at Whole Foods

Published

on

Dive Brief:

  • Amazon is recruiting gig workers to shop for and deliver groceries for Whole Foods Market customers who place online orders, according to a Bloomberg report.
  • Drivers can sign up for the program, known as Shop and Deliver, by reviewing an online tutorial about how to pick, pack and safely handle groceries and passing a quiz.
  • The program is related to Amazon Flex, an initiative the e-commerce provider launched in 2015 that uses independent contractors to deliver packages.

Dive Insight:

Amazon’s effort to use contractors instead of employees to pick Whole Foods orders represents a change of course for the company as it continues its drive to disrupt the grocery industry. Whole Foods, which the company bought in 2017, has until now relied on its own store employees to assemble orders from online customers.

The new program brings in an additional dimension to Amazon Flex, which typically limits contractors to driving orders from an Amazon staging facility to customers’ homes. By entrusting gig workers to put orders together for Whole Foods customers, Amazon is potentially increasing the risk that items could be damaged, spoiled or delivered late that is inherent in grocery e-commerce.

“Delivery from A to B is a beautiful on-demand task because it’s very straightforward, very repeatable and you don’t need a lot of training, [but] tasks in stores are often much more complicated,” said Jordan Berke, a former Walmart executive and e-commerce expert who runs Tomorrow Retail Consulting. “A person that comes to your store once a day or once every two days to pick two orders is always learning, while a person that picks 50 orders five days a week” becomes highly familiar with where items are located and how to handle them.

The detailed website Amazon has set up to recruit workers for the Shop and Deliver program reflects the complexity and potential pitfalls associated with the picking process. The site provides step-by-step instructions about how to keep food safe, bag products, select produce and otherwise properly — and efficiently — assemble grocery orders.

“What you’re looking at here is a fairly disruptive efficiency step toward unlocking potential efficiency,” Berke said. “The platform that figures this out and is able to take a part-time on-demand worker and make them as efficient as an in-store dedicated worker does unlock some significant advantages.”

The use of contractors to handle grocery picking is nothing new, of course. Companies like Instacart have depended for years on gig workers to shop for and deliver grocery orders, and Whole Foods itself worked with Instacart until the companies split up in 2019. But while Instacart works as a partner with grocers, Whole Foods has enjoyed an advantage by having its own, store-based employees manage the order-management process.

Amazon’s decision to test the labor model in Whole Foods stores is part of the company’s broader effort to try new ways of selling groceries, something no other company is as well-equipped to do, said Tom Furphy, a former Amazon executive who is now CEO and managing director of Consumer Equity Partners, which invests in retail technology.​

The e-commerce retailer’s extraordinarily deep pockets put it in a position to be able to experiment freely and try multiple approaches at once as it looks for the best ways to make inroads in a line of business, Furphy said. Those expansive resources also give Amazon the ability to continuously look for ways to reduce costs while keeping customer service top of mind.

Whole Foods has been concentrating on lowering prices, and the company’s CEO, John Mackey, said its ownership by Amazon has played a key role in helping it cut costs, CNBC reported. 

“Amazon is always going to look for ways to keep prices as low as possible. They’re always going to look for ways to keep their cost of service as low as possible, and always look for ways to be super responsive in fulfilling customer demand,” said Furphy, who was formerly Amazon’s vice president of consumables and Amazon Fresh. “Those are three constants that will always exist as long as Amazon’s around, and they will absolutely look to deliver on that in the grocery environment.”

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Workers

Target is giving frontline workers $70 million in bonuses — but their growing gig workforce say they just got hit with a major pay cut

Published

on

By

  • Target just gave 350,000 frontline workers $70 million in bonuses.
  • The company announced the bonus Monday, the same day some of its Shipt gig workforce protested outside Target headquarters in Minneapolis calling for fairer pay.
  • Willy Solis, a lead organizer with the nonprofit Gig Workers Collective, said gig Shoppers were a part of why Target was able to enjoy 273% annual growth in same-day service sales — including curbside pick up, drive up, and Shipt.
  • If you are a Shipt Shopper and would like to share your story, email aakhtar@businessinsider.com.

Target announced Monday that it would offer more than 350,000 frontline employees a $200 bonus each, or $70 million in total.

Target previously gave all hourly full-time and part-time store and distribution center workers $200 bonuses in July. Eligible employees include hourly members in stores and distribution centers, seasonal hires, and hourly team members who “support Target’s guest and team member contact centers.”

Meanwhile, some gig workers for Target-owned delivery service Shipt held a demonstration Monday outside of the company’s headquarters in Minneapolis protesting a new pay model.
Pay for Shipt workers, called Shoppers, is now determined using an algorithm rather than a flat rate, the company confirmed to Business Insider. Shipt classifies Shoppers as independent contractors who are not eligible for employee benefits, including minimum wage or healthcare.

Read more: Leaked Target memo reveals how the retailer is trying to obliterate germs in its stores by wiping down everything from ATMs and handcuffs to Bullseye, the company’s mascot

Some Shoppers have said the algorithmic pay model has lead to lower wages. Molly Snyder, the chief communications officer for Shipt, said Shoppers make $21 per shop including base pay, promo pay, and tips, which did not change on average during the new pay model, but some workers may have seen a decline in pay. Snyder also said there were more Shoppers for Shipt “than ever before” last weekend.

Advertisement


One study, conducted by Coworker.org and an MIT PhD student, found the new pay model resulted in lower pay for 41% of Shoppers, and the number of people earning less is growing.

Willy Solis, a Shipt Shopper and a lead organizer with the grassroots organization Gig Workers Collective, said it felt insulting that Target give bonuses at the same time Shipt Shoppers are calling for fairer pay. Solis said Shoppers were a part of why Target was able to enjoy 273% annual growth in same-day service sales — including curbside pick up, drive up, and Shipt.
“We’re grateful and happy for Target employees to be recognized and for receiving that extra pay, but at the end of the day, we as Shipt shoppers have contributed significantly to make Target a very profitable company,” said Willy Solis, a Shipt Shopper and a lead organizer with the grassroots organization Gig Workers Collective.

Read more: Target just blew the doors off its first quarter earnings. Target CEO Brian Cornell says it was due to these two key factors.

Target bought Shipt in 2017 for $550 million to compete with Amazon and Walmart on same-day delivery. Target is currently valued at $82.5 billion.

If you are a Shipt Shopper and would like to share your story, email aakhtar@businessinsider.com.

Source link

Continue Reading

Workers

More Than One-Third Of Claims For Gig Workers, Self-Employed Unpaid – CBS Chicago

Published

on

By

Continue Reading

Workers

TOM PURCELL: The fate of gig workers could turn on ballot question | Opinion

Published

on

By

Become an employee with full paid benefits, or remain a mostly independent gig worker? That debate’s raging in California as November’s general election approaches, and its outcome is likely to affect the entire country.

According to The Washington Post, “Uber, DoorDash and other gig economy companies are bombarding TV airwaves, social media and even their own apps with ads and marketing materials promoting a ballot initiative [Proposition 22] that they say would improve drivers’ financial situation and working conditions but that would also deny them the right to be classified as employees in California.”

Proposition 22 would give gig workers limited benefits and wage and worker protections, but establish them as an independent class of workers – and undo a 2019 California law, Assembly Bill 5 (AB5), that “would guarantee drivers access to the minimum wage, employer-provided health care and bargaining rights.”

I’ve long been self-employed, with the exception of some recent cybersecurity consulting contracts in which I was paid as a full-time employee with benefits, but that’s been my choice.

Being fully self-employed is not for the faint of heart. Besides cybersecurity consulting and writing a newspaper column, I have an apartment-rental business. I recently earned a real estate license and am selling properties, too.

I manage my own invoicing and taxes. I know to the penny – once my CPA explains it to me and I drop whatever mug of coffee I’m holding – how high my income taxes are. Few employees are aware of how much they pay in taxes or what their benefits cost their employers – which would be helpful to know before voting for new government policies that will increase both.

I manage my own health care insurance, which has gotten plenty expensive in recent years for individuals who don’t qualify for subsidies, in part because of government attempts to expand health insurance to everyone.

But, again, I choose to be self-employed. I like the freedom it provides. But it also makes me keenly aware of the unintended consequences of government regulations and policies.

California’s 2019 AB5 law would require Uber, for instance, to hire drivers as full-time employees with health insurance, paid sick leave and other benefits. Benefits are wonderful, but come at a price.

Uber claims that “if the company were forced to make all drivers across the country employees, for example, it could only support 260,000 full-time roles,” reports The Post. “That compares to 1.2 million active drivers the company was hosting on its app before the coronavirus pandemic.”

Uber also says fares would increase and drivers would be less available and timely – which means you might have to wait a while for your ride home to arrive after a night of enjoying the pub.

What it comes down to is that some politicians believe individuals shouldn’t have the freedom to exchange their skills and services for money from organizations, because organizations take advantage of those individuals. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris support AB5, not the watered-down Proposition 22.

Others think that in a free society, individuals should be able to offer their professional talents to anyone willing to pay for them, and government shouldn’t restrict the terms they negotiate. President Trump’s campaign supports that approach and is critical of AB5 (but has not, to my knowledge, supported Proposition 22).

That’s something else to think about when you vote in November’s election.

TOM PURCELL is a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review humor columnist and is nationally syndicated. Readers can contact him at tom@tompurcell.com.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2019 Gigger.news.