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Does Prop 22 Do Justice for the Gig Workers? | Best Indian American Magazine | San Jose CA

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Forum – A column where you get eyes on both sides of a hot button issue.

Does Prop 22 Do Justice to the Gig Economy? No!

In 1959, despite graduating at top of her law class at Columbia, Ruth Bader Ginsberg had a hard time finding jobs because she was a mother. She, later on, went on to work on gender equality laws over the next decades. As a result, today any reference to an employee’s sex in the workplace decisions irrespective of their capabilities will land employers in a world of legal trouble. At its core AB5 is about economic inequality in the workplace. 

Just like gender equality laws from the 70s, AB5 can appear burdensome to employers. On the other hand, Proposition 22 at its core is about Uber, Lyft, Doordash, and other gig economy companies trying to get away with an awful business model of counting their employees as a variable cost. The ads for Prop 22 mischaracterize the drivers as only part-time workers who already have a full-time job.

Based on my personal experience on multiple Uber rides this is completely untrue. These Drivers depend on UBER for a substantial if not all of their income. And based on my conversations with them they barely earn a minimum wage and have no allowance for the depreciation of their cars. Never mind health coverage.  Uber makes it a policy to lobby and pressure lawmakers in every city to support their flawed business model.

Despite this, their stock is down 20% from IPO in May 2019 and have a 1.6B loss against revenue of just 2.6B. I imagine other rideshare companies are probably in similar shape.  Further with self-driving cars fast approaching its only a matter of time before Uber goes driverless making this move a short-term gimmick to support their flagging stock price.  A favorite argument of conservatives is why have worker regulations at all why not let everyone work for “themselves”. This is euphemistically called the right to work in many states especially the southern states.  In 2008, a detailed study of the RTW states was done by the National Education Council and the findings of the study are very damning. The RTW states have: a higher poverty rate of 14.4% versus the 12% in others, lower per capita income of 38K versus 44K, and a higher rate of uninsured people. The uninsured rate differential is probably even higher today because many of these very states rejected Obamacare Medicaid expansion.  Sustainable economic activity is created as a result of entrepreneurship coupled with good regulation. The choice should not be between no job and a bad job.  

Having said that AB5 is far from perfect. The issue with Prop 22 is that it is a proposition.  We have bi-annual elections and representative democracy – the proposition process just circumvents the legislative process.  So I recommend a no vote on 22.

Mani Subramani is a veteran of the semiconductor equipment industry. He enjoys following politics and economics.

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Does Prop 22 Do Justice to the Gig Economy? Yes!

In these times of rampant unemployment, gig jobs at Uber, Lyft, Doordash, etc. are providing a lifeline to over a million Californians. Prop 22 will eliminate these jobs as the businesses cannot afford to treat these workers as employees and pay for benefits. Prop 22 preserves the right of these drivers to be independent contractors, something that is supported 4:1 by these drivers. The CA Chamber of Commerce and Silicon Valley Group are among others urging a Yes vote on Prop 22. Gig employment offers flexibility and freedom for workers to set their own hours and also work part-time.

Gig employment is going to be the main employment engine of the future. Governor Newsom should immediately campaign for a Yes vote on Prop 22 and ensure its passage. The livelihood of more than a million Californians depends on it. 

Please vote YES on Prop 22.

Rameysh Ramdas is a resident of the SF Bay Area and has a keen interest in Politics and Current Events. 


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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed within this article are the personal opinions of the author. The facts and opinions appearing in the article do not reflect the views of India Currents and India Currents does not assume any responsibility or liability for the same.

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Q&A: Expanding talent management strategies to embrace the gig workforce

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Digital information concept AI-powered, person-centric platforms can help connect the dots between people, work and life to drive smarter decisions, navigate choice and create impactful experiences. (Image: Shutterstock)

The gig economy has been a steadily growing force in talent management for a number of years. But the disruption to the economy and the workforce caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has had many employers rethinking their business and talent management strategies in the past few months, and the switch to a work-from-home model also opened the eyes of many businesses to the possibilities beyond the traditional work arrangement.

Related: Uber CEO proposes new category of employment for gig workers

 

Colin Brennan Colin Brennan, president, Global Solutions & Services, Alight Solutions

Colin Brennan, president of global solutions & services at Alight Solutions, recently shared some thoughts on the increasing role of the gig economy in traditional business models, and what employers can do to attract and leverage talent.

Why is gig work a critical capability for employers to accommodate, and how has the pandemic played a role in shaping this?

The pandemic displaced many highly skilled workers who turned to “gigs” while waiting for the economy and job market to improve. When the pandemic subsides, we’ll see a dramatic redistribution of talent across industries, and these workers will join employers that will likely still be establishing the right resources and technology infrastructure to support a workforce that’s returning to the workplace, remaining remote, or a combination of both.

But gig work is hardly a new phenomenon, as the economy has been reorganizing itself around freelancers and independent contractors for many years. What the pandemic did was force employers to reimagine their businesses and workplaces so they’re more adaptable and resilient in the face of disruption. In situations like these, gig workers give employers the flexibility to scale their workforce up and down based on the demand for goods and services and the skillsets that are needed to deliver them. Jobs that can be performed on an on-demand basis will be a huge part of employers’ talent management strategies moving forward.

How can employers leverage cloud-based HR systems to unify organizations’ people-related data and processes, especially when it comes to effectively managing gig workers?

Employers should be focused on being proactive, fast and lean, especially when it comes to operations. In order to meet the needs of a contemporary, agile workforce, they should evolve their approaches to pay and talent while implementing the right systems. Traditionally, HR systems are not made to effectively manage gig workers — especially when it comes to rapid onboarding and offboarding. As gig workers play an increasingly important role in their operations, employers need nimble processes that run in a paperless fashion during the recruitment and application stages; glean workers’ past employment experiences; leverage mobile as a channel to bring people into the organization and keep them engaged; and help make data-driven decisions around skillsets.

As a result of the pandemic, HR leaders hesitant towards automation may finally make the switch due to the positive correlation with cost and time savings. Cloud-based HR systems can unify employers’ people-related data and processes. By providing a broader view of the workforce, employers can strategically allocate resources, hire the right people at the right times, start programs that nurture talent and, ultimately, elevate the employee experience.

What’s the advantage of offering gig workers diverse options for pay, and what kind of options exist?

In this digital age where information, goods and services are accessible from mobile devices and transactions are seamless, workers expect the same level of convenience when it comes to compensation. That’s why it’s critical for employers using the gig model to ensure quick and stress-free methods of payment for those workers, on their channel of choice.

With more people digitizing their wallets using mobile pay and banking apps, employers should find payroll solutions that can fit seamlessly into that experience. Fortunately, many employers are adopting new processes and technologies — and they’re already “paying” off. They can calculate compensation as time-related data is collected, allowing for more frequent payments that go directly to workers’ digital wallets, much like Apple Pay or Alipay. Alight’s DailyPay on-demand payroll service, for example, allows workers to transfer accrued but unpaid wages to any bank account or pay card in advance of their next paycheck.

Specific to gig workers, they generally expect to be paid for the work they do, as it’s completed, rather than on a typical pay period cycle. This growing trend only adds to the need for employers to have faster and more efficient methods of conducting payroll. That’s where AI and machine learning come in — those technologies can take all the important inputs (e.g., salary, commissions, taxes, travel, expenses, bonuses, etc.) as well as years of historical payroll data, to more accurately assess whether a worker’s paycheck is correct or not.

In addition to pay, are there other benefits employers should consider offering when it comes to attracting the gig workforce and creating a great gig experience?

Employers that can provide engaging experiences that will cultivate gig workers and their skills will be in an advantageous position. While the actions taken and administered will be different, providing additional HR administrative services such as benefits will allow employers to attract and retain the best possible extended workforce.

In today’s experience economy, workers expect to have valuable data and information at their fingertips that can be applied seamlessly across their digitally-driven lives. We believe improving health outcomes and maximizing benefits dollars starts with empowering people to take charge of their total wellbeing with on-demand support from their employers.

AI-powered, person-centric platforms can help connect the dots between people, work and life to drive smarter decisions, navigate choice and create impactful experiences. Consider the possibilities for the workforce if employers use AI to optimize workforce management, pay people faster, provide them with personalized and customized retirement and financial solutions, or even anticipate their healthcare needs, like using biometric data to nudge them to seek care before health issues arise.

 

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How does DoorDash work? Everything to know about the food delivery app powered by gig workers

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  • DoorDash is an on-demand food delivery service that lets you order food and drinks from restaurants in your area.
  • When you order from DoorDash, your food is delivered by a freelance worker who doesn’t belong to any single restaurant.
  • Since restaurants don’t have to hire delivery drivers, DoorDash makes it easier for them to expand their delivery business.

DoorDash is an on-demand food delivery service that partners with local restaurants to deliver food to homes and businesses. However, due to the way that DoorDash orders are delivered, the app makes it easier for restaurants to get into the delivery business.

How DoorDash works

DoorDash operates in hundreds of cities, offering hyperlocal food delivery across the US. The company works with restaurants, letter them set menu prices, but controlling delivery and service fees themselves.

How does DoorDash work? Everything to know about the food delivery app powered by gig workers
DoorDash hosts a variety of different restaurants.Dave Johnson/Business Insider

The biggest difference between DoorDash and other apps is that orders placed through DoorDash don’t make restaurants use their own delivery drivers. Instead, DoorDash has its own fleet of freelance delivery workers – they’re called Dashers – who are paid through tips, a base salary from DoorDash, and by completing “challenges.”
This makes it easier for restaurants to start a delivery business, since they don’t have to hire their own delivery workers.

In the past, DoorDash would take some of their drivers’ tips – they claim this is no longer the case. The company’s been involved in other lawsuits regarding the alleged mistreatment of their workers.

Restaurants have to pay DoorDash to use their drivers and receive orders through the app. Depending on the specific relationship that a restaurant establishes with DoorDash, the restaurant may pay DoorDash a monthly fee, a flat fee per order, or a commission based on how much money they make.

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These fees are used to pay Dashers, perform background checks on these Dashers, process credit card transactions, pay for advertising and marketing, and more.

DoorDash gives restaurants a choice about how they offer their delivery services. Storefront, for example, is a service that DoorDash offers that lets customers order from the restaurant’s website, not just the app. DoorDash Drive is built for big orders, like catering platters, and lets restaurant handpick Dashers to help them make those large deliveries. And DoorDash also allows restaurants to rely on the app exclusively for all deliveries.
For restaurant owners who want it, DoorDash also offers data analytics to help restaurants better understand their business and work more efficiently, as well as standalone tools like a net profit calculator for delivery sales. The DoorDash Merchant Portal lets restaurants track sales, adjust the menu, and track metrics like total sales, average order size, and most popular menu items.

How does DoorDash work? Everything to know about the food delivery app powered by gig workers
DoorDash offers a suite of services to help merchants run their business more efficiently.Dave Johnson/Business Insider

For customers, DoorDash has obvious value: it enables fast ordering and delivery for restaurants across the local area. Using the DoorDash website or mobile app, you can search for local restaurants, browse the menu freely, and track the order as the driver picks it up and brings it to you.

Not every restaurant offers their entire menu on DoorDash, however – the restaurant gets to choose their online menu. And since they don’t manage their own delivery drivers, any issues you have with delivery will likely need to be taken up with DoorDash, not the restaurant.

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Joe Biden’s new gig – TechCrunch

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After serving as Obama-Biden campaign manager and White House Deputy Chief of Staff and now living in San Francisco and working with the tech sector, I am hopeful about the Biden-Harris administration’s ability to put in place smart policies and regulatory stability to further unleash the industry’s vast potential — not to mention the effect their calm and measured leadership could have on our greater economy.

However, with new leadership comes new perspectives on many of the most critical issues facing Silicon Valley. While the bonds between the innovation economy and the Obama-Biden Administration resulted in national prosperity, the tech sector is now intertwined in nearly every facet of American life.

The resulting tension means the new Administration will take its role as regulator seriously and investors and businesses alike should not overlook how quickly President Biden will move on policy – especially as it relates to the future of work and getting the U.S. economy back on track.

There’s no question the gig companies had a banner year in 2020. Even with ride-hailing usage down dramatically, the strength of meal, grocery and just about everything else delivered combined with the victory in California of Proposition 22 has driven up market caps and positioned many startups for going public. Yet, while the West Coast may be feeling emboldened, the Beltway has another trajectory in mind.

Congress has been working on gig worker classification legislation named the PRO Act for months. The bill closely mirrors the maligned California Assembly Bill 5 that Proposition 22 mostly reversed. It’s broadly supported by labor and could see some traction this year. Labor is already working hard to line up support from the various Congressional coalitions, and at the same time gig economy companies are gearing up to fight it with their unlimited resources.

The question is – what will President Biden do? Long ago he voiced his support for AB 5 and laid out plans to solve worker misclassification during the campaign, but he’s also hiring and appointing staff to the Administration deeply experienced in tech. President Biden has been governing longer than most startup founders have been alive, he’s a master at understanding forces in Washington and how to reach a compromise. He knows that what’s rarely discussed during legislative debate is how the law will actually be implemented.

We shouldn’t be surprised if the Biden Administration convenes the Department of Labor and the industry to determine how companies actually enact worker protections.

Despite most bills being thousands of pages, they’re rarely prescriptive. Those details are left up to agencies. President Biden has oversight of the Department of Labor, which, if the PRO Act is passed, will be responsible for its implementation.

We shouldn’t be surprised if the Biden Administration convenes the Department of Labor and the industry to determine how companies actually enact worker protections. President Biden’s nominee for Labor Secretary, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, while a staunch supporter of labor, is also well regarded by the business sector as someone they can work with and reach a compromise.

We just have to look to the states to understand why this outcome is so plausible. The gig companies already have Proposition 22 type campaigns underway in six states and are running legislation in a half dozen more. By the end of 2021 there will be law on the books codifying worker protections in nearly a third of the country, modeled on Proposition 22.

This kind of momentum is hard to ignore and labor knows it. Although labor is aligned in its support of the PRO Act, the alignment becomes blurry when considering state action. For example, many northeastern states have had a thriving black car and taxi industry for decades.

This means Labor’s position on gig laws in New York and New Jersey are quite different than places like Washington State or Illinois where gig workers are still relatively new and the ink is drying on regulations supported by Uber and Lyft just a few years ago. Labor is aligned as much as they can be and enough to support the PRO Act, but there isn’t a national movement and that leaves room for compromise.

This is all good news for the tech sector. It’s a fantasy to think that regulation wouldn’t eventually come to protect the very workers who power the gig economy. And that’s a good thing – tech has a moral responsibility to do right by its workers. However, those regulations shouldn’t and won’t be imposed on tech. Rather it will take weeks and months of campaigns and bills winding their way through the states and Congress, culminating with negotiations and compromises.

Or maybe even years of renewed regulatory processes. All of which will be overseen by a new President who has witnessed first-hand over his career how innovation can help the nation grow and recover.

After four years of Trump’s stubborn denialism, magic thinking and economic harm, Biden will promote policy rigor, public spiritedness and private sector ingenuity to work together for innovative solutions. It will be hard work and I promise you it won’t be pretty, but we should expect the dawn of a new era of U.S. tech-driven dynamism.

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