Connect with us

Companies

Big News: New to Remote Working? Have a Lesson From the Gig

Published

on

– Advertisement –

As world events push against workers towards a remote working model, individuals are looking to technology to help bridge the gap between day to day communication and company operations. For a few workforces, it doesn’t necessarily come naturally, although the coronavirus catastrophe is triggering a new way of working completely. For companies that rely on gig workers, remote working has turned into a method of life for a while.

Think beyond Deliveroo and Uber: gig employees cover an enormous selection of occupations, such as copywriters, web developers, graphic designers, and the thousands of consumer support workers supporting brands. Businesses have been applying these people, for several decades, to offer support on demand. Between the methodologies they put in place and the technology they utilize, businesses who are daunted by gig employees can instruct the new generation of distant workers something or two about.

The following is business advice from the front line of the gig. Managing customer expectations is essential in times of disruption, and individuals understand that there are a few reductions in service out of their control. But will naturally see less effect on their bottom line. Adaptability and willingness are key. By this time, their workforce has moved to work due to forced or self-isolation, and this also includes customer care. On the other hand, the way we think about customer care, as well as needs to modify.

Firstly, communicate to your clients on the way support is being redesigned by you, so their expectations are being handled at all times. Secondly, it’s vital to be certain that your customer care staff are prioritizing their workload and deprioritizing. Look to your technology to be certain support tickets are being ordered according to those priority levels. If you’ve got a platform set up, can it be accessed by your workers securely, and from home? If your workforce has reduced capacity because of illness, and will you provide support? This might be a time to contemplate moving entirely to support through chat or messaging, providing 24-7 assistance that is digital through gig workers.

This may be obtained compared to telephone support with long wait times. During periods of isolation, some businesses may experience. Ramping up client support capacity and receiving the ideal technology in place is a company operation improvement. Engagement skills are essential: they need to feel close to the companies they support to succeed, although Many gig employees may never satisfy with their managers. Providing all the tools and support to them and coaching they need to do their jobs is critical.

Personalizing the participation is crucial, don’t just send long one-way memos, build out a means for them to engage in conversation in a manner that is scalable. Do you have the ability and a knowledge base to add and answer frequently asked questions? This could be made available via collaboration applications. It’ll be a basis of making sure a majority-remote workforce feels connected, rather than a loose group of workers. Managers in the gig economy know they will need to stay workers incentivized to retain them.

This is often done via gamification, which rewards, or involves producing status amounts to promote development. Gamification can be used in media sharing worker engagement platforms, and programs. These programs may be utilized to amplify messages of how you are encouraging your employees and customers. It’s critical that brands are seen to do the right thing and those that do that will weather the storm. One of the most difficult parts of managing a gig workforce is currently making workers feel valued.

I believed that the best way to produce workers feel valued is to attach them. For instance, there are gig client support platforms, which allow the client to give feedback. This”thank you” has got an amazing impact and spurs gig workers on to keep on providing excellent service. By placing technology and measures in place, businesses may discover that they adapt well to having a remote work force and that working becomes a part of a new operational model especially customer service. With the gig customer service economy booming, there are loads of great examples to go by, and as we browse uncertain times to improve how we work, communicate with each other and serve our clients.

– Advertisement –

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Companies

‘More than a job’: the meal delivery co-ops making the gig economy fairer | Gig economy

Published

on

By

Cristina González did a lot of waiting in 2018. Back then, the 29-year-old was a courier for the Spanish food delivery platform Glovo in her Basque home town, Vitoria-Gasteiz. She talks about feeling as if she was on standby the whole time: “You’re effectively having to be working constantly.”

While Glovo serves restaurants, customers can also order from supermarkets. This, Gonzalez says, was “a complete shitshow: supermarket orders are really easy to screw up”. If the supermarket did not have an item in stock and González completed the order, she might get a poor rating from the customer because of the missing item. If she turned down the order, González worried that it might affect her score on the platform. “It was very, very stressful.”

Gonzalez is still a courier but is making €10 (£8.70) an hour after tax and social security contributions, more than double her previous wage. She says customers of Eraman, the delivery cooperative she now rides for, are more understanding about minor issues, the jobs are more varied;she despatches as well as delivering, there is better communication, and she feels like she has more control.

Cristina Gonzelez at work for Eraman
Cristina Gonzelez at work for Eraman. Photograph: Paul Iano/Eraman

She could, she says, imagine staying in this version of the gig economy far longer than she might have at Glovo – five to 10 years, she says. “It’s a job, but it’s also more than that. In Eraman you are a link in a chain, a member of a team, in Glovo you are a pawn, the last position in a hierarchy.”

In Berlin, Mattia Carraro experienced a similar trajectory: the 33-year-old courier worked at Deliveroo for two years before joining Khora, a 30-person food delivery collective set up in March last year. Germany offers relatively decent conditions for food delivery couriers – those working for the big platforms are employees with social security generally paid by the hour rather than per delivery as is the case for most couriers in the UK.

While satisfied with the pay, Carraro was bothered by the deep insecurity of the job, “that from one day to the next it might go away”, as well as the anonymity. Deliveroo ceased operations in Germany in 2019 and when Khora came along he signed up. Although his role involves significantly more administration – a two-hour weekly general meeting where decisions are reached via consensus, plus approximately 15 hours of unpaid managerial duties a week – Carraro feels happier working as part of a cooperative.

“For me, it’s OK to earn less money but to work in an environment that always makes me feel good, where I know problems are going to be solved and we’re all friends. This is something we don’t want to do for just a season or until we find something better, but a job you really want to keep and you like.”

Mattia Carraro of the Khora collective taking a break at Hermannplatz, Berlin
Mattia Carraro of the Khora collective taking a break at Hermannplatz, Berlin. Photograph: Marvin Systermans

Carraro doesn’t just do bike deliveries: like other members of the cooperative, he handles some of Khora’s dispatching work. “I go for a nice walk with my dog and eat breakfast outside, then at noon I start work, while chain-smoking, eating yoghurt and popcorn as I dispatch. Then at 10pm my shift is over and I eat properly.”

At different ends of Europe, these cooperatives are worker-led and pride themselves on being democratically governed. Eraman’s co-founder, Paul Iano, 28, says the 10-person cooperative reaches decisions via discussion. “The thing I like to say about cooperatives is that if you’re having to vote on it, you’ve already got a problem.”

But neither venture could exist without the bike delivery software they rely on.

Enter CoopCycle, the brainchild of Alexandre Segura, a computer programmer from Marseille. Back in the spring of 2016, Segura found himself heading to the Place de la République in Paris almost every evening for Nuit debout, a French protest movement that has been compared to Occupy.

Segura helped build a website for the movement and spent much of his time talking about how the gig economy could be exploitative and harmful, and how more of it should be run by the users. “It planted seeds in my mind,” he says.

So, later that year, when his brother-in-law along with thousands of others lost his job as a courier for the Belgian food delivery startup Take Eat Easy, it prompted Segura to start a new venture in his spare time “as an intellectual exercise”.

He says he wanted to reverse-engineer the technology offered by Deliveroo, Uber and other big platforms to empower couriers. The result was a delivery app that offered software and support but required users to fulfil two conditions: they had to be worker-owned and all profits had to be distributed among the worker-owners.

“No CoopCycle, no party,” is how Carraro puts it, telling me that the cost of getting a bespoke delivery app designed would be prohibitively expensive for the average collective.

Recently, the world seems to have started thinking more like Segura does. Spain’s supreme court ruled in September that riders working for Glovo are not self-employed but salaried employees with the right to paid holidays and sick leave.

At least 40 legal challenges to employment conditions for riders and drivers have been raised against gig economy companies including Uber and Deliveroo.

Deliveroo’s shares plunged 26% in its much-anticipated London stock exchange debut in March, with many investors expressing concerns about the conditions faced by its self-employed riders.

This increased scrutiny came with rolling lockdowns that shut down much of the hospitality industry and sent meal delivery orders through the roof. The Amsterdam-based Just Eat Takeaway reported a 79% increase in orders for the first three months of 2021. And despite its disastrous stock market launch, Deliveroo is reporting a doubling of order volumes in the same period.

Segura’s colleague Adrien Claude says 90% of non-profit food delivery cooperatives have also reported a boost in business during lockdown.

The co-ops say their business model offers a better deal for restaurants as well as riders. Eraman, for example, charges restaurants between 10-20% of the value of the order, while Deliveroo takes 32%, Glovo’s average fee is 35% and Just Eat and Uber Eats’ commission is 36.20%. In Berlin, Khora offers a flexible system which gives restaurant-clients more autonomy than if they were to pay a set percentage.

But whether worker-led delivery co-ops can provide a real alternative to the delivery giants remains to be seen.

A Glovo food delivery courier in Madrid during the first wave of the pandemic
A Glovo food delivery courier in Madrid during the first wave of the pandemic last year. Photograph: Juan Medina/Reuters

Prof Vera Trappmann of the University of Leeds, one of the co-authors of Global labour unrest on platforms: the case of food delivery workers, thinks the cooperative model shows us the possibility of a different future – “of alternative ways of dividing up risks and earnings”. A radical change in working conditions for couriers ushered in by Coopcycle seems unlikely, she says. Yet, she believes this amalgamation of digital platforms with worker-led co-ops is here to stay.

“We know that young people especially don’t like working in the bureaucratic, exploitative environments offered by many companies and as such, often opt for self-employment. They’re more prone to questioning the value of working for corporations, and co-ops may become more and more of a home for such people.”

CoopCycle now has 67 co-ops across seven countries in its “federation” and has extended from Europe to Canada and Australia. It is on the cusp of deals with collectives in Argentina and Mexico for the first time, though there is a debate in process over whether motorcycles would be a breach of the federation’s environment-friendly values.

Claude sounds both fired up about the future and gently exhausted. “We’re trying to change the world – it’s tough because we’re human and nothing’s perfect. It probably never will be perfect but we’re trying to make things better by the day.”

Source link

Continue Reading

Companies

The Big Gig: FinTech Australia’s new board member

Published

on

By

Former senior advisor to the Turnbull and Morrison governments Harry Godber has been added to the board of FinTech Australia as an independent director.

Mr Godber acted as an advisor to Minister for Superannuation, Financial Services and the Digital Economy Jane Hume, where he led initiatives in fintech and financial regulation. He also worked on Australia’s Consumer Data Right, superannuation reform and the introduction of new payment regulation.

Mr Godber was an Industry, Innovation and Science Adviser to Ministers Arthur Sinodinos and Michaelia Cash, and, in a separate role led product and strategy at the CSIRO’s Data61.

“With the right policy and regulatory settings in place, fintech is poised to lead Australian consumers and business through our economic recovery,” Mr Godber said.

Mr Godber currently works as head of strategy for Flare, a fintech focused on HR, banking and superannuation.

Harry Godber, a former senior advisor to the Turnbull and Morrison governments has been added to the board of FinTech Australia. Image: Twitter.

Deloitte has promoted Rob Hillard to be its Asia Pacific consulting leader, where he will oversee around $2 billion worth of consulting work in the region.

Mr Hillard has worked as the consulting giant’s chief transformation officer for the past year and was previously Deloitte’s chief strategy and innovation officer. After being made a managing partner in 2015, Mr Hillard oversaw the doubling of Deloitte professionals to over 3,000 by 2018.

Mr Hillard is a member of the Deloitte global board and the Chairman of the Australian Information Industry Association.

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) Commissioner Sarah Court is leaving the watchdog after more than a decade to join the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC). Ms Court joins ASIC after wide involvement in the ACCC’s work, including chairing the its enforcement, compliance, Consumer Data Right and legal committees and as a member of the merger review and competition exemptions committees.

“This is a well-deserved reflection of the experience, expertise, and wisdom Sarah brings to the table,” ACCC Chair Rod Sims said “ASIC’s gain is very much our loss.”

The new Australian Public Service Academy will be led by Grant Lovelock, who has been responsible for skills funding and apprenticeship policy at the Commonwealth Department of Education and Training. Most recently Mr Lovelock has worked at the Department’s National Careers Institute.

The University of Sydney’s United States Studies Centre (USSC) has added three more non-resident experts: former chief of staff to President Trump Mick Mulvaney, former Director General of ASIO Duncan Lewis and Sir Roland Wilson Scholar at the Australian National University’s National Security College Jennifer Jackett.

Mr Mulvaney and Mr Lewis join as non-resident senior fellows while Ms Jackett joins the University’s Foreign Policy and Defence Program as a non-resident fellow.

DXC Technologies lost associate partner Pewter Klement, who joined Avande this month. Mr Klement leaves DXC after three and a half years for the Microsoft focused Avande.

Alan Cameron has stepped down from the board of PEXA, the online property exchange network he helped establish in 2010, to fulfil a COAG initiative to deliver a single, national e-conveyancing solution to the Australian property industry.

Mr Cameron will be replaced by finance industry veteran Mark Joiner as independent non-executive Chairman.

Construction software firm Asite has announced the appointment of Kyle Hamer as chief marketing officer. Mr Hamer will lead the global marketing and communications team from the company’s Houston office.

AUmake, the ASX-listed company that connects Asian influencers with Australian brands has a new chief financial officer, with Tony Guarna joining this month. Mr Guarna has held finance chief roles at several ASX companies and joins AUmake as its user base hits more than 27,000 after launching in October last year.

Global semiconductor technology and equipment firm Revasum appointed Rebecca Shooter-Dodd as chief financial and operating officer, formalising her operating responsibilities in addition to her current role as Revasum’s chief financial officer and company secretary.

Former Gartner director Rhys Binney has been announced as Axe Group’s senior vice-president of growth strategy. Mr Binney joins the insurance software provider after three years as a director at Gartner for their CIO and CEO advisory groups.

UK fintech Marqeta has named Duncan Currie as country manager for Australia and New Zealand as part of its plans to establish an Asia Pacific Headquarters in Melbourne. Mr Currie is an industry veteran with almost two decades of payments experience, serving as a consultant and advisor to local fintechs, alongside stints at ANZ, Visa and Tuxedo Money.

Do you know more? Contact James Riley via Email or Signal.

Source link

Continue Reading

Companies

Free the Gig Economy! | City Journal

Published

on

By


Last week, the Biden administration made another effort to drag the U.S. labor market back into the past. The Department of Labor withdrew the independent-contractor rule, a Trump-era regulation that made it easier for firms to classify workers as contractors instead of employees. It’s not yet clear what will replace it, though President Biden says he supports the ABC test that California tried to implement, which would classify most contractors as employees—including not just drivers for Uber and Lyft but even freelance writers.

The Labor Department and the media are framing the administration’s move as a way to ensure that workers in the gig economy are protected and paid overtime and minimum wage. Yet many workers prefer the flexibility of contract work, which lets them set their own hours and work for other companies. According to a Fed survey, most gig workers report high levels of satisfaction with the arrangement. When California tried to classify gig workers as employees, the state faced pushback not just from companies but from gig workers themselves.

They have good reasons to prefer it. The nature of work is changing, as it has throughout history. It once was considered dehumanizing that most workers should be beholden to a single employer. Today, we’re forcing this arrangement on people who don’t want it.

The rollback of the Trump rule joins a list of policies—efforts to increase unionization, low-skill manufacturing, and “shovel-ready” infrastructure jobs—by which the Biden administration is attempting to shoehorn the modern labor market into a 1950s mold. The problem with these policies is that the labor market has changed. When work was more uniform, workers were easier to replace, so forming strong ties to one’s employer made sense for job security. Unionization also made sense because it allowed the large numbers of lower-skilled workers to pool together for similar pay and benefits.

Over time, however, manufacturing, construction, and most other jobs have become more technical, requiring skilled workforces. The more skilled the workers, the less incentive they have to attach themselves to individual jobs or to pool risk with fellow workers. The more skills you have, the less unionization makes sense because you’re effectively subsidizing lower-skilled workers. And workers today also place a higher premium on flexibility. This may explain why the unionization drive at Amazon has not succeeded.

As we emerge from the pandemic, we should expect the value placed on flexibility in work arrangements to increase. The expanded availability of remote work, combined with the continuing unpredictability of school re-openings and child-care arrangements, make benefits like the ability to set your own hours and the freedom to work for multiple employers more important than ever.

Some Biden policies, like making it easier to buy health insurance without an employer, move in the right direction. The administration would do well to pursue more measures like these that embrace the new economy, rather than trying to force workers into structures better suited for the economy of more than a half-century ago.

Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2019 Gigger.news.