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Unions Divided Over Big Gig Firms’ Lobbying for State Worker Laws, Benefits

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Uber and other gig economy companies are trying a new approach to ending their battles with unions, and getting ahead of possible federal regulation that could upend their business based on classifying workers as independent contractors.

In New York, for example, gig economy companies are working with several unions including the Machinists and Transport Workers Union to strike a compromise that would allow drivers and food delivery workers to organize in a union and negotiate minimum pay and other benefits without being reclassified as employees.

With the support of the unions, the gig economy companies are pushing state lawmakers in Albany to pass a bill that would allow workers to negotiate wages and caps on company commission fees, and provide unemployment insurance in some circumstances.

Among the most vocal opponents of a proposed bill to achieve that goal is the Service Employees International Union’s (SEIU) northeastern Local 32BJ, which says the compromise would enshrine gig workers’ misclassified status and create a company-sanctioned union that would only further erode workers’ rights by setting no floor for the negotiations.

“This legislation moves workers backwards,” Kyle Bragg, 32BJ’s president said. “There’s too much company manipulation.”

Amid the controversy, efforts to have the bill introduced before the end of the state’s legislative session this week failed.

New York is just one of several states where gig economy companies led by Uber, Doordash, Lyft and Instacart are courting unions and state officials in an effort to cement their workers’ status as independent contractors across the United States.

FAULT LINES

The push by the gig economy companies has exposed divisions within organized labor over whether to bargain with the companies, or insist on workers being reclassified as employees with full protection of U.S. labor standards – and a clear legal right to join unions.

The rifts at times also run within the same union. For example, while 32BJ rejects the New York bill, SEIU President Mary Kay Henry in the past said she would back workers’ demands in reaching a deal with companies. The SEIU declined to comment for this story.

Similarly, the New York chapter of the AFL-CIO, the largest U.S. labor federation, backs the compromise proposal, while members of its Colorado chapter said they were opposed to bargaining agreements with the gig companies.

According to a Reuters review, the companies over the past few months set up lobbying groups in Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Illinois, Colorado and Washington to push for laws that declare app-based ride-hail and food delivery drivers independent contractors, while proposing to offer them some benefits. In some states the companies hope for buy-in from labor groups, company and union officials said.

The companies are trying to build on their success in California, where voters approved an industry-backed ballot measure that exempts ride-hail and food delivery workers from rules that require other types of contractors to be classified as employees, and provides them with limited benefits.

The companies say they pursue tailored policies for each state to combine flexibility for their mostly part-time workers with benefits and protections. They have yet to offer concrete proposals in most states.

Some executives hope state-based independent contractor laws can also forestall federal action by the labor-friendly Biden administration, which has vowed to end the misclassification of workers as independent contractors.

“The models that are developed at the state level can be given a framework at the federal level,” Lyft President John Zimmer said during an interview last month.

While any state law could be superseded by federal rules, Zimmer’s calculation assumes that the U.S. Labor Department is less likely to act once facts on the ground are established.

The companies’ race for state backing runs counter to the labor movement’s single biggest legislative priority, the passage of a far-reaching labor reform bill known as the PRO Act in Congress. The bill would make worker organizing easier and among other things reclassify most independent contractors as employees for the purpose of collective bargaining, though not for wage laws and benefits.

The bill is unlikely to pass the Republican-led U.S. Senate, but even if it did, several years of regulatory and court wrangling would ensue, a time during which gig workers’ rights would remain unchanged, said Wilma Liebman, former chair of the National Labor Relations Board.

SKEPTICS ON BOTH SIDES

Some union figures have therefore taken a more pragmatic approach. Andy Stern, former president of the SEIU and at the time one of the most politically influential labor leaders, for the past six years has been trying to strike deals between the gig companies and unions, including failed attempts in California to ward off the ballot measure.

The California referendum, a costly victory for the gig companies, was also a cautionary tale for unions, as well as for drivers, who are now left without any avenues to organize or object to the terms stipulated by the companies.

Stern said internal union surveys in New York had repeatedly shown that a majority of drivers did not want to be employees and said debates focused solely on reclassification were based on unrealistic and purist sentiments.

Stern instead advocates for drivers’ rights to organize in unions and negotiate their own contracts.

“Give a worker a union and collective bargaining and they’ll decide themselves what kind of status, wages and benefits they want. People who believe litigation and legislation are the solution have failed these workers,” Stern said.

Stern and others dubious of reclassification point to Seattle and New York City, where years of union efforts to organize drivers have led to the only driver minimum wage laws in the country.

Uber and Lyft have rocky histories with unions and workers who want to organize. The companies in 2015 enlisted the U.S. Chamber of Commerce for a years-long court battle against a Seattle law spearheaded by the Teamsters union that would have allowed ride-hail drivers to bargain collectively.

Uber more recently appears to have opened up to such agreements, however. The company last month recognized Britain’s GMB union as the collective bargaining unit of its 70,000 British drivers. Lyft’s Zimmer said the company was having constructive conversations with labor leaders.

Many union officials remain skeptical about basing workers’ fate on the goodwill of companies.

“You never get everything you want out of collective bargaining…and it would be better to give drivers more options and protections under the law,” said Kjersten Forseth, political and legislative director for the Colorado AFL-CIO, which plans to make state-based gig worker policy solutions its focus over the next two years.

(Reporting by Tina Bellon in Austin; Editing by Andrea Ricci)

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Universal Basic Income can provide support for people in gig economy

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Income supports encourage people to not work? Duh, June 4

In an era of self-regulation, it is presumed that all employers will follow all protocols to ensure the safety of their staff during COVID-19, but perhaps this is not the case, and some employees might prefer to stay at home, instead of facing an unprotected workplace.

Who could blame them?

As far as the Universal Basic Income, in the Ontario trial, is concerned, weren’t most of the participants already working at two jobs in the gig economy and these did not generate enough income to provide stable support to them?

Margaret Perrault, North Bay, Ont.



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New regulations to improve safety in the gig economy

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New regulations requiring online platforms to provide food delivery riders with personal protective equipment and induction training have been announced by NSW Minister for Better Regulation Kevin Anderson.

A new penalty system for riders will also be introduced as part of the reforms “to crackdown on repeated unsafe practices”.

The NSW Government intends to finalise the regulations by November 2021. Public consultations on the proposed laws are expected in September 2021.

The reforms follow a safety blitz conducted by SafeWork NSW, which found 9 out of 10 food delivery riders were not wearing safe, high-visibility clothing. Forty percent of the riders observed were also riding in an unsafe manner.

The measures reflect the recommendations of the final report of the Joint Taskforce into Food Delivery Rider Safety (the Taskforce), which was released on 5 June 2021. The Taskforce was setup in November 2020 to investigate the deaths of 4 food delivery riders in 2020, and to identify safety improvements for the industry.

Other recommendations in the Taskforce’s final report include:

  • further compliance monitoring of the food delivery sector by SafeWork NSW
  • ongoing enforcement activities by NSW Police to ensure food delivery riders comply with road rules
  • finalisation of the Guide to Managing WHS in the Food Delivery Industry, as well as the development of supporting factsheets in multiple languages
  • the provision of reported incident data to food delivery platforms to assist continual improvement of compliance within the industry, and
  • development of guidance on delivery bag standards by Transport for NSW.

Explore further on CCH Pinpoint® — Topic Guide: Gig economy.

Sources:

Minister for Better Regulation and Minister for Transport and Roads, New laws to drive safety outcomes in the gig economy, [media release], 5 June 2021, accessed 7 June 2021.

SafeWork NSW and Transport for NSW, Joint Taskforce: Food Delivery and Rider Safety (Final Report), 1 April 2021, 7 June 2021.

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Gig Economy Market to Grow with Sustainable CAGR During 2021 – 2026

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Gig Economy  Market to Grow with Sustainable CAGR During 2021 – 2026

The business intelligence report of Gig Economy market accurately predicts the industry’s performance for the upcoming years to aid stakeholders in making beneficial decisions. Important data points like the growth catalysts, restraints, and lucrative prospects molding the market dynamics are deeply analyzed in the report.

Moreover, the study identifies the major challenges for businesses and offers insights into the opportunities that will help the industry progress in unexplored territories. Moreover, the report factors in the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic for stronger realization of the growth trajectory of this domain.

Key highlights from the COVID-19 impact analysis:

  • An overview of the pandemic’s effect on the global economy
  • Supply and demand changes in the industry
  • Current and future market trends in relation to the pandemic

Request Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.business-newsupdate.com/request-sample/145141

An overview the regional landscape:

  • As per the report, the geographical landscape of the Gig Economy market is divided into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East & Africa, South East Asia.
  • An overview of the growth patterns of each regional industry over the stipulated timeframe is cited.
  • Sales, revenue, and growth rate of each regional contributor is included in the report.

Other highlights from the Gig Economy market report:

  • The product segment of the Gig Economy market is classified into Asset-Sharing Services,Transportation-Based Services,Professional Services,Household & Miscellaneous Services (HGHM) andOthers.
  • The revenue and sales volume predictions of each product type is incorporated in the document.
  • Other important aspects like growth rate, market share, and production patterns of each product type over the analysis period are provided.
  • The application segment of the Gig Economy market is divided into Traffic,Electronic,Accommodation,Food and Beverage,Tourism,Education andOthers.
  • Market share and growth rate of each application segment over the assessment timeframe are enumerated as well.
  • The competitive landscape of the Gig Economy market is defined by key players such as Prosper,Lime,Etsy,BlaBlaCar,VaShare,Envato Studio,Fon,BHU Technology,Didi Global,Snap,Freelancer.com,Zipcar,Uber,Toptal,Stashbee,Eatwith,Lyft,Couchsurfing,PeoplePerHour,Spotahome,Care.como,E-stronger,Silvernest,Upwork,Fiverr,Steam,Hubble,Home Away,Omni,Airbnb,JustPark andAirtasker.
  • The report also consists of information regarding the industry share held by every company, along with their pricing models and gross margins.
  • The report evaluates the competition trends and their business implications.
  • Industry value chain analysis with respect to top manufacturers, vendors, and buyers are incorporated in the document.
  • The Gig Economy market report also provides Porter’s five forces analysis and SWOT assessment to determine the feasibility of new project.

Reasons to access this Report:

  • Get to know opportunities and plan strategies by having a strong understanding of the investment opportunities in the Gig Economy Market
  • Identification of key parameter driving investment opportunities in the Gig Economy Market
  • Facilitate decision-making based on strong historic and forecast data
  • Position yourself to gain the maximum advantage of the industry’s growth potential
  • Develop strategies based on the latest reports.
  • Identify key partners and business development avenues
  • Respond to your competitors’ business structure, strategy and prospects
  • Identify key strengths and weaknesses of important market participants

The key questions answered in this report:

  • What will be the market size and growth rate in the forecast year?
  • What are the key factors driving the Global Gig Economy Market?
  • What are the risks and challenges in front of the market?
  • Who are the key vendors in the Global Gig Economy Market?
  • What are the trending factors influencing the market shares?
  • What are the key outcomes of Porter’s five forces model?
  • Which are the global opportunities for expanding the Global Gig Economy Market?

Table of Contents for market shares by application, research objectives, market sections by type and forecast years considered:

Gig Economy Market Share by Key Players: Here, capital, revenue, and price analysis by the business are included along with other sections such as development plans, areas served, products offered by key players, alliance and acquisition and headquarters distribution.

Global Growth Trends: Industry trends, the growth rate of major producers, and production analysis are the segments included in this chapter.

Market Size by Application: This segment includes Gig Economy market consumption analysis by application.

Gig Economy market Size by Type: It includes analysis of value, product utility, market percentage, and production market share by type.

Profiles of Manufacturers: Here, commanding players of the global Gig Economy market are studied based on sales area, key products, gross margin, revenue, price, and production.

Gig Economy Market Value Chain and Sales Channel Analysis: It includes customer, distributor, market value chain, and sales channel analysis.

Market Forecast: This section is focused on production and production value forecast, key producers forecast by type, application, and regions

Request Customization on This Report @ https://www.business-newsupdate.com/request-for-customization/145141

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